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Victoria Falls: It's BIG!

Due to its size, Victoria Falls can only be photographed in its totality by flying high above it (no spot on the ground allows for a single unobstructed view of the entire water curtain).
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UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 14: Rainbow over Victoria Falls (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1989), Zambia-Zimbabwe. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 14: Rainbow over Victoria Falls (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1989), Zambia-Zimbabwe. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)

The size and scope of the world's largest single waterfall is in many ways beyond comprehension, until you see it with your own eyes.

Victoria Falls, on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe, is the largest single sheet of falling water in the world. 360 feet high, a mile wide, and flowing on average at 38,000 cubic feet per second; without seeing a photo it's nearly impossible to visualize.

Due to its size, Victoria Falls can only be photographed in its totality by flying high above it (no spot on the ground allows for a single unobstructed view of the entire water curtain).

In this episode of Moments in Travel I use Victoria Falls to pose a question: can any camera really compare to what you see with your own eyes?