Adorable Vintage Trailers Bring Style To Simple Living

These Adorable Vintage Campers Take Trailer Living To A Whole New Level
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Trailer living brings about a certain mental image that's usually not very flattering. However, when that trailer happens to be a vintage model, it's another story. The New York Times reported on the small trend of retro trailer ownership, which has appealed to two seemingly different camps: Those who are short on space and those who want to follow the lead of the tiny house movement.

So, what makes these trailers more appealing than newer models on the market? We emailed two vintage trailer enthusiasts, Matthew Reader, a realtor in Palm Springs, California, and Beth Lennon, the blogger behind Retro Roadmap, for their thoughts.

"I think the appeal of vintage campers is that they're a reminder of a simpler time -- hitch up the trailer behind your car, and get away! Our Scotty was built to be affordable to the average family, fit in a standard garage and be light enough to tow behind a standard car (at the time when V8 engines were common in family cars)," Lennon says. Take a look at her 1964 Serro Scotty, below.

Though she has completely decorated the trailer in retro style (naturally) and plans to use it while traveling, Lennon also has other creative plans for it. Her husband, musician Cliff Hillis, plans to use it as a recording studio.

For Reader, who owns multiple trailers, it's about fulfilling a childhood dream. "I grew up with travel trailers (my first trip through Palm Springs was in a pop-up camper with my parents in the 70s) and always would ask my dad why we didn't have an Airstream (loved them even then) and he'd reply: 'those are for rich people. If you want one, you'll have to buy it yourself.' So I did. Three of them," he says.

Here's a view of the exterior and interior of one of his Airstream trailers -- the Excella model.

If you've been thinking about indulging your retro fantasies and making the leap to owning a vintage trailer, there's currently one for sale on Tiny House Listings. Otherwise, check out the vintage section on Airstream Classifieds.

Of course, everything old was once new. Here's what a few of these vintage trailers looked like when they were fresh on the market. (A special thank you to Airstream for sharing a selection of nostalgic photos.)

When Vintage Trailers Were New
An Airstream with a gorgeous view.(01 of 13)
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(credit: Airstream)
An Airstream to tote your scuba gear.(02 of 13)
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(credit: Airstream)
Taking a picnic lunch break.(03 of 13)
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(credit: Archive Photos)
Trailers on display in 1959.(04 of 13)
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(credit: The University of Virginia)
The trailer life in Florida, around 1951.(05 of 13)
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(credit: Florida Memory)
A trailer park circa 1937.(06 of 13)
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(credit: Arthur Rothstein/Library Of Congress)
Bicycling through a Florida trailer park, around 1963.(07 of 13)
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(credit: Florida Memory)
A trailer with its own "patio" area.(08 of 13)
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(credit: Sickles Photo Reporting via Getty Images)
Another Florida trailer camp.(09 of 13)
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(credit: H. Armstrong Roberts via Getty Images)
A classic Airstream trailer.(10 of 13)
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(credit: Airstream)
An Airstream at a beach party.(11 of 13)
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(credit: Airstream)
Towing an Airstream.(12 of 13)
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(credit: Airstream)
An English camper, around 1960.(13 of 13)
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(credit: Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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