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Wendy Williams Reveals She's Been Living In Sober House: 'That Is My Truth'

The talk show host recalled her "struggle with cocaine in my past" during an emotional moment.

Wendy Williams revealed she’s been residing at a sober living facility weeks after returning to her eponymous daytime talk show following a two-month absence. 

The 54-year-old host, who’s been candid about overcoming a cocaine addiction early in her career, opened up about her ongoing sobriety journey during an emotional moment on Tuesday’s episode of “The Wendy Williams Show.”

“Well, for some time now, and even today and beyond, I have been living in a sober house,” Williams said fighting back the tears. “When you see me come to work, glammed up, right after the show I go across the street, I do my Pilates. I told you, two hours a day, I like to take care of my body.”

“I’ve had a struggle with cocaine in my past,” she continued. “And I never went to a place to get the treatment. I don’t know how; except God was sitting on my shoulder and I just stopped.”

Williams explained that she only told husband Kevin Hunter about her decision to seek treatment, keeping her living situation a secret from her closest friends and family. 

“Only Kevin knows about this. Not my parents, nobody. Nobody knew because I look so glamorous out here,” she continued speaking directly to the camera. “I am driven by my 24-hour sober coach back to a home that I live in the Tri-State with a bunch of smelly boys who have become my family.”

The talk show host didn’t specify what she was seeking treatment for but said she attends several meetings each day after her show is finished taping. 

“I see my brothers and sisters caught up in their addiction and looking for help. They don’t know I’m Wendy. They don’t care I’m Wendy,” she added. “There’s no autographs, there is no nothing. It’s the brothers and sisters caught up in the struggle.”

She also must adhere to the facility’s rules, which requires all residents to return to their rooms with lights out by 10 p.m.

“I go to my room, and I stare at the ceiling, and I fall asleep to wake up and come back here to see you,” Williams confessed. “So that is my truth.”

Wendy Williams at Sirius XM studios in 2016.
Wendy Williams at Sirius XM studios in 2016.

In January, Williams announced she’d be taking a “necessary, extended break from her show to focus on her personal and physical well-being” after fracturing her right shoulder, according to the show’s official statement. At the time, she was also experiencing complications from Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disorder that results in hyperthyroidism.

Multiple guest hosts including Jerry O’Connell and Nick Cannon helped host the show in her absence. 

In the past, Williams has described herself as a “functioning addict” during her early radio career in New York City.

“I was burning the candle at both ends and in the middle. Second of all, I had the money and the access and time to be able to do it,” Williams said back in 2014. “I could literally lay lines out right there. And I stooped to smoking crack, and that’s no secret. I could literally smoke my crack right there in the studio.”

Williams’ Hunter Foundation has since launched a 24-hour hotline service in partnership with the organization T.R.U.ST. to provide resources and counseling to anybody impacted by drug addiction and substance abuse.  

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