Westminster Senator Woods Compares Police To Crips and Bloods

Police officer at sunset in New York City
Police officer at sunset in New York City

"We're in a spot in our country where, at the federal level, they have taken away a bunch of states' rights and virtually all citizens rights."

Who said that? And what country are they talking about?

You're right! It's Westminster Republican State Sen. Laura Woods talking about the United States.

She's agreeing with a KLZ 560-AM radio host who said, "I'm beginning to think that there is not a sector of government that doesn't think they're above everybody else."

"Yeah, that's probably a good assessment, right now," Woods replied, apparently forgetting that someday she may need the help of firefighters, first responders, military personnel, or countless other public servants who sacrifice their lives for ours.

The overall topic was asset forfeiture, and Woods was angry about its abuse by police. But does this mean the police act like Cripps and Bloods?

CALLER MIKE: Ok, so, Laura, these [police] are no different than the Bloods and the Crips that they're constantly whining and crying about down in downtown Denver or Colorado Springs, or up in [Fort] Collins. I mean, how is law enforcement different from the people they're fighting? I mean, if they can just take your stuff for no reason.

WOODS: Yeah, when they are taking stuff from innocent people with no conviction or no charges filed, they are no different.

CALLER MIKE: Yeah.

WOODS: Yeah.

I have my problems with asset forfeiture, which has resulted in unfair confiscation of property by police. But are the problems on par with what we see from Crips and Bloods.

The Crips are one of the largest and most violent associations of street gangs in the United States, with an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 members. It has been involved in murders, robberies and drug dealing, among other crimes.

There is no known national leader of the Bloods but individual Bloods sets have a hierarchical leadership structure with identifiable levels of membership. These levels of membership indicate status within a gang. A leader, typically an older member with a more extensive criminal background, runs each set. A set leader is not elected but rather asserts himself by developing and managing the gang's criminal enterprises through his reputation for violence and ruthlessness and through his personal charisma. The majority of set members are called "soldiers", who are typically between the ages of 16 and 22. Soldiers have a strong sense of commitment to their set and are extremely dangerous because of their willingness to use violence both to obtain the respect of gang members and to respond to any person who "disrespects" the set. "Associates" are not full members, but they identify with the gang and take part in various criminal activities.

Maybe you don't like using Wikipedia as a source, but you get my point about Woods, whose fate in November's race against Democrat Rachel Zenzinger will likely determine control of state government. (Republicans hold the state Senate by a one-seat margin.)

On Facebook, Woods defended her comparison of police to Crips and Bloods, and she wrote that she supports law enforcement.

Woods: If there is no due process, if you haven't been charged or convicted of a crime, why is it okay for law enforcement to take something from you? And what makes that any different than a gang member or a common street thug who takes something from you?

Listen to the entire interview. You'll hear it was the host who brought up the Crips and the Bloods, but you'll also hear that we were talking about WHEN NO CONVICTION HAS BEEN HANDED DOWN AND NO DUE PROCESS HAS BEEN MET. TO BE CLEAR ... I do support law enforcement at every level, and I always have.

When an elected official, even one like Woods who likes Trump, compares police officers to Crips and Bloods, even under specific circumstances, it shouldn't fly under the media radar, like this May 26 statement of Woods did.

What do the police think of this? Even if Woods believes her comparison is sound, does she think the community benefits from her comparison?