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What Do Fashion Week and Election Politics Have in Common?

Just as in our political race right now, everyone wants change; everyone wants to be happy and beautiful. We just can't all seem to agree on how to achieve it.
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Plenty, in my opinion.

They both are selling hope for change, and with it, dreams of a more beautiful tomorrow: If you only buy my dress, or my candidate, your whole life will look and feel better.

In short, they are both the stuff of fantasy.

And very often, by reading the tea leaves of a fashion season, you can tell a lot about the mood of the times.

Let's take this season, for instance. We are in the midst of a big election year and two of our biggest name designers, Michael Kors and Marc Jacobs, took the proverbial ball and ran with it.

Michael -- who often travels to exotic locales for his inspiration -- this time stayed home to deliver a fashion tribute in red, white and blue (and brown and camel) polka dots, stripes, and plaids -- pure clean Americana.

The other big metaphoric flag-waver, Marc Jacobs, had his models outfitted as futuristic suffragettes, with pieces of Americana from the 30s to the 80s.

Everyone else seemed to march to the beat of their own drummers.

Hippie chicks (thanks Diane von Furstenberg and Alice + Olivia).

Ladies from "Little House on the Prairie" (thanks Betsey Johnson).

Those who were draped (Yigal Azrouel, BCBG et al).

And those who were dripping in dough (Oscar de la Renta was beautiful, as always).

And speaking of dough for my money, Donna Karan had "the" standout collection of the week. She called it "Liquid Assets" which consisted of loosely-draped dresses, gowns and jumpsuits that looked both incredibly sexy and comfy. A Nobel Prize worthy collection!

Francisco Costa for Calvin Klein had another breakthrough. He created museum-quality Cubist constructs -- a collection of beautiful pieces that seemed to float on air, but are also meant to fold flat into a suitcase. Another Nobel Prize please?

Some big trends included jumpsuits on every runway, big belts, exposed zippers, dresses that float and lots and lots of draping.

The point is, we come to the end of a beautiful season that was truly all over the place. There was no imperative. Just as in our political race right now, everyone wants change; everyone wants to be happy and beautiful. We just can't all seem to agree on how to achieve it. So far the electorate seems about evenly divided.

So too does 7th Avenue!