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HuffPost What's Working Honor Roll: Berlin's Bold Move On Affordable Housing Could Have A Big Ripple Effect

BERLIN - NOVEMBER 27:  Cars pass a sign, environmental zone, indicating the new pollution class for cars on November 27, 2007
BERLIN - NOVEMBER 27: Cars pass a sign, environmental zone, indicating the new pollution class for cars on November 27, 2007 in Berlin, Germany. Starting from January 1, 2008 Berlin will have an environmental zone which restricts the traffic for high emission vehicles. Being allowed to drive into the inner city you must be in possession of a certain pollutant group sticker. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

A law passed on Monday has made Berlin the first city in Germany to introduce a rent cap, preventing landlords from charging new tenants more than 10 percent above the local average, The Guardian's Ruby Russell reported Monday.

Over the last decade or so, housing prices in Berlin have skyrocketed and made living in the city increasingly difficult for low-income residents. By implementing rent control, the city hopes to keep those residents in Berlin rather than forcing them into outer districts, as has happened in places like Paris and London.

The new measure raises the possibility of other German cities and European countries following Berlin's example. For instance, in the UK, which is facing its own housing crisis, The Telegraph noted that the law could serve as a useful blueprint beyond Berlin.

"Many are now asking whether Berlin's rental cap is the answer to Britain's housing crisis," The Telegraph writes.

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The What’s Working Honor Roll highlights some of the best reporting and analysis, from a range of media outlets, on all the ways people are working toward solutions to some of our greatest challenges. If you know a story you think should be on our Honor Roll, please send an email to our editor Catherine Taibi via catherine.taibi@huffingtonpost.com with the subject line "WHAT'S WORKING."

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