THE BLOG

Why No One Puts Ugly, Unhappy Photos on Facebook

But when I take part in this sport, I always try to come from a place of love and challenge my judgmental self to just observe. When I do catch myself out, wondering why she would choose to wear that dress, I smile and thank life for diversity.
This post was published on the now-closed HuffPost Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and posted freely to our site. If you need to flag this entry as abusive, send us an email.

We all do it, only share the beautiful, most successful versions of ourselves in this space, carefully selected and presented to the world.

From time to time I have caught myself online, aimlessly clicking, sucked into the albums of "friends" I don't really know. As I experience your wedding, new home, baby and world class holiday, I feel slightly uncomfortable and perhaps a little dirty. I know this exercise never leaves me feeling good and yet I continue to click, image after image, experience after experience.

It's like I'm searching for something, some sort of proof that my life is okay and the choices I've made along the way where the right ones, knowing all the while that my life really does not look like this.

I'm not sure how you; old friend from school, person I met on holiday 10 years ago, hold the key to this, but I continue to click, hunting, searching.

On the other hand, I love people watching in the street. In fact, I've not met many people who don't enjoy this sport, this voyeuristic art. Watching the way people move, what they wear and the way they interact with others -- it's fascinating, it's addictive. I often forget they can see me too, have I spend too long online?

But when I take part in this sport, I always try to come from a place of love and challenge my judgmental self to just observe. When I do catch myself out, wondering why she would choose to wear that dress, I smile and thank life for diversity.

So then, what's the difference? How can one activity leave me feel so bad, and one so thankful?

I guess it's a matter of reality.

Online we edit, omit, use filters, even Photoshop. We have time to think and plan how we want to be seen by others, the ego kicks in and self preservation takes control.

In reality, walking down the street we are who we are, there is no where to hide, no time to pick the best frame, this is it, this is me.

How does Facebook stalking make you feel?