IMPACT

Child Labor Only Occurs In Poor Countries And 4 Other Myths About The Practice

Indian child laborers carry sacks of vegetable leftovers collected from a wholesale market to be sold in their shantytown, on
Indian child laborers carry sacks of vegetable leftovers collected from a wholesale market to be sold in their shantytown, on the World Day against Child Labor, on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Friday, June 12, 2015. Despite the country's rapid economic growth, child labor remains widespread in India, where an estimated 13 million children work, with laws meant to keep kids in school and out of the workplace routinely flouted. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

The ILO defines child labour as work that “deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, and that is harmful to physical and mental development”. In its most extreme forms, child labour can involve youngsters being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to hazards and illnesses or left alone on city streets.

“People don’t always understand the seriousness of child labour and many may see it as an acceptable pathway to adult work,” says Quinn. “What we’re focused on is ensuring children are free to access education.”

To mark World Day Against Child Labour, we bust five myths on child labour and its impact on children.

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