Would You Live In A House Where Someone Was Murdered?

The "Amityville Horror" house is officially on the market.

Would you buy a house if someone was murdered in it? Would you even live in it? Earlier this month, Caroline D’ Antonio put the Amityville Horror house on sale after her husband died. She wanted to downsize her living space. If you do an Internet search for creepy death homes you will find the following:

  • The White House
  • The Villisca axe murder house
  • The LaLaurie Mansion
  • Wonderland Avenue Murder house

Sometimes murder houses are so creepy they have to be destroyed. During John Wayne Gacy’s days as a serial killer, he buried his victims in his basement. Detectives that investigated Gacy said the house had an overwhelming smell of death. The house was eventually demolished. Also, the former home of the late Nicole Simpson Brown no longer exists. Brown and a friend were both murdered in 1994. Any secrets held within the walls of their homes died along with its victims.

The "Amityville Horror" house. Would you live in it?
The "Amityville Horror" house. Would you live in it?

People are Fascinated by Haunted Houses

Some famous death houses can still find new tenants. For instance, Ronald DeFeo Jr. killed his entire family in the Amityville house in 1974. He claimed he heard voices that told him to kill his family. People have continued to live there since the murders.

An advantage to moving into a death house is you won’t have much competition. Because of its history, you may be able to buy it for a reasonable price. The only downside is dealing with the creepy stalkers who take pictures of your house.

So what about the White House?

For years, ghost hunters have claimed that Abraham Lincoln still haunts the White House. Ghosts have never stopped anyone from living and working in the White House.

For centuries, people have believed in haunted houses. Supposedly, ghosts are the spirits of people who didn’t leave after they died. So would you care if someone had died in your house? For some potential homeowners, they just want a house—even if it comes with ghosts.  

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