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Another Use For Yik Yak On Campus? Cheating On Exams

TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Rob LEVER, US-IT-Internet-teen-trend 
A March 28, 2014 photo illustration shows the Google Play Stor
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Rob LEVER, US-IT-Internet-teen-trend A March 28, 2014 photo illustration shows the Google Play Store download page for an anonymous social networking app in Washington, DC. When a new social app Yik Yak swept into Auburn University, some of the coolest kids started posting comments on it. But no one knows who is making the comments, because the posts are anonymous. 'It spread pretty fast,' says Nickolaus Hines, a junior at the Alabama university. 'The majority of things are jokes or things which are obviously funny.' But Hines added that 'some of the things are pretty mean,' and that 'the ones about girls get taken off if the girls see them.' Yik Yak, which allows users to see posts in a radius up to eight kiolometers (five miles) is part of a flurry of new apps which offer new ways to interact anonymously in social networks. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

With new technologies come new ways to cheat. Yik Yak, the anonymous, location-based app that has been a hotbed of cyberbullying on college campuses, is also the newest tool for students seeking to cheat on exams.

J. Scott Christianson, an assistant teaching professor in the department of management at the University of Missouri at Columbia, has been monitoring Yik Yak recently to see what students are talking about.

Read more on The Chronicle of Higher Education

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