The Blog

You Will Have a Great Day

The British astrologer Sally Brompton is always right, or at least she is when she's saying good things about my life. If it's positive, I bounce into my day with confidence. If it's negative, I go read another horoscope.
This post was published on the now-closed HuffPost Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and posted freely to our site. If you need to flag this entry as abusive, send us an email.

Today I will feel like I'm living in a Hollywood movie. It says so right here. And the British astrologer Sally Brompton is always right, or at least she is when she's saying good things about my life. I read Sally's horoscope every morning in the New York Post online, after brushing my teeth and before making coffee. If it's positive, I bounce into my day with confidence. If it's negative, I go read another horoscope.

Sally Brompton is the best of the thinking person's astrologers, a darling from back in the days when I was a fashion editor at Glamour. Just like theatre people are notoriously Jesus freaks -- ever read a Playbill, in which most of the actors seem to thank God for their starring roles? -- fashion people are irredeemably fixated on astrology. In Elle Décor, designer Isaac Mizrahi once listed Sally Brompton's horoscopes as one of the twelve things he couldn't live without.

Sally's scopes are invariably intelligent and ethically astute, but if her outlook for me is cloudy I move on in search of a brighter forecast. One site I got hooked on when I was researching Jung for a historical novel is Astrodienst. Staffed by Jungian analyst astrologers working in Zurich -- an image that alone should send you running to the site -- it spits out free daily horoscopes calibrated to the exact time of your birth and features lots of other free goodies such as relationship horoscopes.

Michael Lutin, whose horoscopes appear in Vanity Fair and at www.michaellutin.com, is another favorite of the smart horoscope devotee -- if that isn't too much of an oxymoron -- though I find his language often inscrutable and his website frankly whacko. Brit Jonathan Cainer is also one people like, but it annoys me that the free forecasts on his site are sketchy, always asking you to pay if you want any real advice.

I don't want to pay, because despite my devotion to Sally, I don't really believe in astrology. How could you believe that something like the position of Pluto, which isn't even really a planet anymore, can determine how much money you get for your next book? Yet, extrapolating from Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, simply knowing your horoscope can influence reality, so that thinking my day will be like a Hollywood movie will make me act like a star, which will make the world treat me like a star, which will make my life like a movie. It's kind of the same idea as The Secret: Think positive thoughts and you will attract positive reality. I don't believe that either. But I'm going to keep doing it anyway, just in case.

Popular in the Community

MORE IN LIFE