Bernie Madoff

Politics
It's unclear whether the president will consider the notorious Ponzi schemer's clemency petition.
OWN
"I was happier than I had been in years."
Entertainment
Someone just hand him the Emmy already, OK?
Politics
Donald Trump puts on a show of being rich. There's that private jet stamped Trump. He assures everyone, ad nauseam, that he's really, really rich. But apparently it's all a sham.
Post 50
Richard Dreyfuss talked about Madoff, and how no one else could have played him. How he IS Bernie. Both from Bayside Queens, they have the same accent, similar background, and history. He was king of a Madoff-like blow-hard without the Bernie soft playfulness -- at first anyway.
Business
There are the low-cost-but-highly-improbable options. Yep, I'm talking about the scratchy lottos. But I can't bring myself
Entertainment
You'd think that Bernard Madoff, who built the good life for himself with the biggest Ponzi scheme in history, might be a complex, nuanced, fascinating man. In an evil sort of way. You'd be wrong.
Entertainment
Think The Wolf of Wall Street (from another era and without the sex and drugs) meets the indie masterpiece 99 Homes (about the housing market crisis).
Politics
Two points were made in the October debate that deserve scrutiny. One was voiced by several candidates, from Senator Rand Paul to Governor Chris Christie: Namely, that the government has been "stealing" from Social Security. The other is that Social Security is a giant Ponzi scheme Let's discuss why this is a terrible misrepresentation of this program and how Social Security actually works.
Business
Embrace your scars. When you have something to offer you'll be sought. The person who wants something least holds the stronger position. Living the dream is never giving in to adversity -- hold ground, then bounce back.
College
I am writing this piece to fully investigate for myself, whether Higher Education is a Ponzi scheme. For the past year now, after leaving the system, I have had a growing suspicion that it is.
Comedy
Last week the Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002 was again in the news. I can't compete with Sarbanes-Oxley. I can't make up stuff this good.
Politics
You know the statistic. We incarcerate a higher proportion of the population than any other country does. Hundreds of thousands of young, now aging, men, are doing hard time for possession of small amounts of drugs. More and more people find themselves in jail because they got caught with bench warrants for their arrest for exorbitant fines they could not afford to pay. More than a century after debtors prisons were abolished, thousands are again behind bars because of debts. But one category of felon is free on the street. I refer, of course, to corporate criminals. Consider the case of a checkout clerk at Walmart who puts her hands in the till and walks off with a couple of hundred bucks of the company's money. That clerk could expect to face prosecution and jail. Now consider her boss, who cheats her of hundreds of dollars of pay by failing to accurately record the time she clocked in, or the overtime she worked.
Business
Fifteen people, including Madoff himself, have been convicted at trial or pleaded guilty in connection with the Ponzi scheme
Business
Despite a deep, close and extremely lucrative relationship that lasted decades, JP Morgan Chase wasn't even required to publicly disclose the information that detailed its complicity in Madoff's scheme, including how much money it made and how.
Videos
Eleanor Squillari joins HuffPost Live to explain why she thinks that Bernie Madoff was a sociopath.