The Big Push

While many discuss whether some signs of environmental improvement result from economic slowdown, and less intensive use of natural resources, or from successful pro-green regulations, we argue that a much deeper transformation is happening across China.
Scientific advances and our experience on the ground now give us the historic opportunity to end HIV as an epidemic and turn it into low-level endemicity. But to complete the job we need to be much smarter.
The annexation of Crimea by Russia this week is likely to have far-reaching consequences for an already much marginalized group within society.
By Julie Steenhuysen Tuberculosis typically attacks the lungs and is spread through the air when people who have an active
UNITAID was launched in 2006 by the governments of Britain, Brazil, Chile, France and Norway to give sustainable funding
Worthy of kudos is when I hear of friends who may not have verbally come out to their family, but instead mustered the willpower to bring their partner to a family gathering. I heard a few of these stories during the recent Lunar New Year festivities.
This is why we work, not for big projects or abstract achievements but for the difference we can make in people's lives. Simply put, our organization, India HIV/AIDS Alliance, strengthens community action on AIDS in India.
Emerging powers are well positioned to have an enormous impact on the regions in which they reside as well as on the global stage. They should maximize this impact in positive and mutually beneficial ways, helping to lead and support strategies for global and regional growth.
"The fact that so many people are infected and dying from mosquito bites is one of the greatest tragedies of the 21st century
World AIDS Day, at the beginning of every December, is a reminder for Christians across the world who mark this same time as Advent -- when we await a child who will save us. This year, and every year, we must be the people of faith who save the children all across the world.
In total, 162 people from 50 countries shared videos of themselves shot at one of our booths or in their homes to tell their
It is entirely possible -- but not inevitable -- that this generation will be the last to suffer from the disease. The only variable is whether there is the will to make it happen.
In the United States and Europe, people living with AIDS received treatment to keep them alive, but there was a widely held view that treatment was too expensive and too difficult to be provided successfully in the developing world.
The truth is that in many ways, here at home, we've ended 1985's meaning of "AIDS as we knew it." It's not an unspoken word -- nor is it an automatic death sentence. And since PEPFAR, we're on the road to do the same globally. But now we have to end the era of AIDS -- period.
The African proverb "it takes a village" is often used to describe how the upbringing of a child is the responsibility of the extended family -- a communal effort. And as there is nothing more precious than the life of a child, it's beyond justification that every day 700 babies are needlessly born with HIV. Over the past 32 years, AIDS has killed more than 35 million people, many of them children. So when it comes to looking at what it will take to win the fight to end AIDS, the saying "it takes a village" has never had more meaning.
We've come so far since the days of unnecessary dying, even without yours truly as a doctor. We don't need to fear diseases like HIV, malaria or TB as death sentences anymore, but challenges we have the power to overcome.
To borrow and reimagine the words of President Kennedy: We choose to end AIDS. We choose to provide access to treatment to everyone in the world living with HIV by the end of this decade, not because it is easy, but because it is hard. This is our moon shot.
Wesley's HIV status did not change my love for him, but his death five months after that phone call, coupled with the loss of a second friend in five years hits me every time I hear the words "HIV is no longer a death sentence."
There's something really powerful about seeing tens of thousands of dance fans come together not only for a festival, but to loudly and proudly show their support for the battle to end this terrible disease. It's support like this which helps move the dial; it shows governments and businesses that young people care.
With World AIDS Day following Thanksgiving so closely this year, let's be thankful ...