Chernobyl

Radioactive boar are found in Sweden 31 years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.
Urban Exploration (also called Urbex or simply UE) might be one of the most extreme hobbies that exist. If asked, urban explorers would tell you this is more than just a hobby, it is a way of living and thinking.
The Ukrainian town of Pripyat has been deserted for 30 years after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded. Now, the government says the region could be an ideal location for the world’s largest solar farm.
After a disaster, when stress may be ubiquitous and access to medications scant, routine cases of cardiovascular disease, cancer, lung disease and diabetes can quickly evolve into life-threatening emergencies.
This week marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. More than an accident, it was the beginning of the meltdown of the Soviet Union and defrosting of the Cold War. Mikhail Gorbachev has written that Chernobyl "was an historic turning point" and "perhaps the real cause of the collapse of the Soviet Union five years later." The secretive, cover-up culture of the Soviet state, he recalls, kept timely information from getting to the top so a quick response could be formulated. "The Chernobyl disaster, more than anything else," says Gorbachev, "opened the possibility of much greater freedom of expression, to the point that the system as we knew it could no longer continue. It made absolutely clear how important it was to continue the policy of glasnost."(continued)
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Looking back on the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, here are six structures constructed to mitigate the effects of man-made disasters.
A botched test at the nuclear plant triggered a meltdown that permanently poisoned thousands.
Today, it is mostly silence that surrounds the abandoned buildings that stand as testimony to the hasty departure.
The world commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophic accident in Ukraine on April 26, 2016.
In both Chernobyl and Fukushima, before disaster began to unfold, few imagined that such a catastrophe was possible. In the United States, too, despite the knowledge since 1945 that nuclear power, at war or in peacetime, holds dangers of a stunning sort, the general attitude remains: it can't happen here.
How do these events inform us about the future of nuclear power, or its place in addressing climate change? One view is that nuclear power is safe and cost-effective, with long periods of stability and reliability interrupted infrequently by accidents. The other view is that power from the atom is unsafe and costly, with catastrophic accidents separated by periods of stability leading to a false sense of security.
Today, thirty years after the nuclear disaster, the Babushkas have outlived by a decade their counterparts who fled to the
Sleep, which occupies more than one-third of our lives, has been relegated to a quiet corner of mystery, like a far-off celestial planet that shines bright but appears too far off to really ponder or try to fully understand.
There is a constant world struggle between the energy HAVES and the HAVE-NOTS. Between the unstable Middle East oil nations, and most of the rest of the world. Between Russia--and its Eastern and Western European neighbors, between the HAVES of Central and South American and the Asian HAVE NOTS.
This is my fourth year attending the Los Angeles Film Festival, produced by Film Independent and hosted by L.A. Live Regal Cinemas in downtown Los Angeles.