COP 16

COP24 climate negotiations kick off in Poland on Monday.
On November 16, the CLG released a policy briefing to assist countries with their long-term planning, ensuring they are business
After I've had an opportunity to reflect more calmly and carefully on the implications of the forthcoming Trump presidency for environmental, natural resource, and energy policy, I will return to this topic.
McCarthy says that disclosure isn't limited to progress on explicit goals, but on milestones that are proving to be good
"The private sector can take a role, they can make progress to some extent but it's going to be difficult for them to get
California can play a very important role by showing leadership -- in two key ways. One is to demonstrate a commitment to meaningful reductions in GHG emissions. In this regard, California has more than met the bar, with policies that are as aggressive as -- if not more aggressive than -- those of most countries.
Most vulnerable to the world’s rising temperatures are developing countries.
There are a substantial number of issues that negotiators will eventually need to address, and likewise, there are a set of questions that researchers (including within the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements) can begin to address now.
The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to temporarily halt implementation of President Obama's Clean Power Plan until the courts reach a final decision on the legal merits has raised concerns in other countries about the ability of the U.S. to meet its climate commitments.
One cannot understate the importance of the agreement arrived at in Paris. For the first time, world leaders have faced up to the stark warnings that climate scientists have been issuing for years, instead of shrinking away with denial and delay. And while the commitments made in Paris aren't on their own enough to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations at safe levels, they are enough to begin bending the emissions curve towards a safe climate. Paris is a beginning of a process.