Fiscal Cliff

Boehner has already nominated himself as the Republican Party's sacrificial lamb. But on his way out, he could also be a very effective scapegoat, thus sparing both his party and the country at large a whole lot of needless drama and economic instability.
I know reporters don't have time to hook every national political development to our humble locale. But they should give it their best shot, because the stakes are so high.
A Republican Senate is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee of the return of "fiscal cliffs" and "government shutdowns" and "hostage-taking" and all the rest of the budgetary games Republicans are known for playing.
The homebuyer of tomorrow should not be asked to pay for the fleeting temporary tax reduction and unemployment benefit extension of yesterday.
A look at the statistics of the U.S. national debt tells a story of fiscal nirvana. Between 2000 and 2014 America's GDP grew
Boehner was narrowly reelected as speaker in 2013, days after several members of the House GOP's right flank were left frustrated
I blame the fiscal cliff. And why not? It is the so-called El Niño of today, the easily scapegoated scourge of our time. Wait. Why did I just modify El Niño? Have I too adopted the so-called media's latest tic? Damn it again! Damn you fiscal cliff!
There was plenty of gloomy economic news throughout the year. Yet, despite all those economic issues, the stock market ended the year at record highs, with the Dow up 25 percent and the S&P 500 up nearly 30 percent.
Welcome back to our annual year-end awards column! Part one of this column ran last week, just in case you missed it. We've got a lot to cover, so let's jump right in with no further introduction.
President Barack Obama and his family return early from Hawaii to Washington for fiscal-cliff talks; however, the constant wording that they were on "vacation" bewildered me.