How I Did It

Every day, Americans wake up to frightening headlines from all across the globe. Warring factions of terrorist groups, especially in the Middle East and Africa, show no signs of desiring peace, and the threat of nuclear attack is ever present.
No matter your situation in life, you can change your circumstances. You have all the capability within yourself to make good things happen. And while pursuing your goals, you can enjoy every minute of it.
Entrepreneurs not only provide us with critical innovation and keep us at the forefront of global markets, they also create ways to gain financial independence. So why has the percentage of start-ups in the U.S. dropped significantly in the last 35 years?
We should do more to help potential entrepreneurs in places where domestic economies are too weak to assist. If we give this effort a higher priority in our country's foreign policy, we can create a healthier balance of world commerce.
In many ways, an entrepreneur's career is like a football game. Both combine a swift pace with a highly competitive atmosphere. The "game" is divided into four quarters. In the first quarter you assess the other team's strengths and weaknesses based on your scouting report.
Over my nearly 70 years as an entrepreneur, I have sometimes been described as a visionary, but this is really a misnomer. The truth is that I am a tremendous opportunist.
I'll begin where the majority of successful entrepreneurs begin--"follow your passion." It may be a shopworn phrase, but this advice is as valid today for how to succeed in business as it was a hundred years ago, and it has certainly proven true for me.
Risk and fear are the yin and yang of entrepreneurship, and no one knows this better than those who start a business. Prospective
Based on my seven decades of business experience, I can see only one solution: millennials must create their own jobs.
It's a far cry from their previous existence in Denver, Colorado. But John and Ellen consider themselves to be the luckiest people in the world running their small hotel and restaurant in the Belizean beach paradise of Placencia.
Warren Ogden couldn't afford to set up his ideal business in the U.S. Yoga and fitness had been part of his life for years. He had studied it at Duke University in North Carolina -- and later in India, at the Agama Yoga centers in Rishikesh and Dharamshala. He completed his yoga teacher training at the Holistic Yoga School in Boulder, Colorado. So he decided to open it somewhere else.
There are places in the world where artists seem to congregate and San Miguel de Allende in Mexico's colonial highlands is one of them. They began arriving here in the late 1940s thanks to the establishment of two art schools, Instituto Allende and the Escuela de Bellas Artes, which drew, in particular, former American soldiers who were funded to study abroad on the G.I. Bill.
Isabelle and Robert Shahverdians lived and breathed stress and chaos in Los Angeles. Their lives were filled with long work days and long commutes, all to pay for life in the fast lane.
When Jack Stewart graduated from culinary school in Toronto, he didn't anticipate living his dream life in the colonial city of León, Nicaragua.
When he was 35, Colin Brownlee had an epiphany -- a life-changing moment. He was staying at a small hotel on the beach, on Hawaii's Big Island. The landscaping was lush and tropical, there were hammocks slung between palm trees.
How I Did It: Watch as cousins, Travis and Ryan Croxton discuss how they were able to bring back a 100-year-old, family-owned oyster business and make it successful and profitable.
How I Did It: Watch as CEO Walter De Brouwer discusses how a tragic accident that left his son with a traumatic brain injury, led him to start his company Scanadu and the invention of the Scanadu Scout, a vital sign monitor that analyzes, tracks, and trends your key vitals in 10 seconds.