Hurricane Isaac

“We’re not going to impede anybody getting out of here, but at the same time we’re a law enforcement agency, so we still have to conduct our duties."
Storm surges and flooding in Orleans and parishes nearby this fall can be at least partly blamed on El Nino. This year's weather event is believed to be the most intense of its kind since 1997 or earlier, creating hazards for Louisiana's coastline.
Just days into the crisis, the American public realized that the human and animal tragedies were bound together, and they were rooting for all to survive and get back on their feet.
Louisiana, a major exporter of coal from other states, could ship far more of that fossil fuel once the Panama Canal is widened
For unfunded parts of LA 1, some money could come from tens of billions of dollars in fines likely to levied against BP and
Josh talks to environmental activist Erin Brockovich about her fight to get justice for the families displaced by the Bayou Corne sinkhole in Louisiana.
Full Segment: Josh talks to environmental activist Erin Brockovich about her fight to get justice for the families displaced by the Bayou Corne sinkhole in Louisiana.
At the eight-acre, Bayou Corne sinkhole in Assumption Parish, owners of slab houses are waiting for methane-gas monitors to be installed in December.
With less than seven percent of this initial commitment to the Gulf Coast met, it's fair to say BP must do a better job of working fairly with the state and federal trustee to move projects forward.
A plan several years ago to bury transmission and other power lines at the University Medical Center and Veterans Affairs hospital in BioDistrict New Orleans, where both complexes are under construction now, was termed too costly.
BP oil and tar that washed ashore or was uncovered in Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. Bernard and other Louisiana parishes during Hurricane Isaac is settling into wetlands and shutting some public beaches.
Through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram I see and hear what all my friends and loved ones are doing. I can hear their stress and can affirm how they are coping. I can send love and prayers and they can see that other people see them in their time of distress.
The amount of oil churned up in the month after the storm served as a springboard for members of the authority to voice open
Residents of the Jefferson Parish town of Jean Lafitte, 25 miles south of New Orleans, hope a levee can be built soon after they were inundated by Isaac in August and a string of earlier storms.
On the eve of Hurricane Katrina's 7th anniversary in New Orleans, students found themselves anxiously awaiting Hurricane Isaac's arrival. Only time could tell if Katrina's destructions would be mirrored or forgotten.
Armstrong Energy in Missouri hopes to open a company-backed RAM coal terminal in Alliance, La. on the west bank of the lower Mississippi River in 2014. But residents of Ironton, located just south of RAM's site, say they don't want their air quality to get any worse than it is now.
Drawing parallels between rising food costs and the earthquake in Haiti redefines the word "disaster" specifically reminds us of its human causes -- and it is a clarion call for action, a warning of an impending humanitarian crisis.
For the now-destabilized Gulf Coastal wetland ecosystems, a slow-moving hurricane with heavy rain and high, shoreline-pounding surf may be the most damaging type of storm. This is true especially around the mouth of the Mississippi River, which took a direct hit from Hurricane Isaac.
Regionally, 12 mobile kitchens staffed with Southern Baptist volunteers cranked out an estimated 211,000 meals before withdrawing