Hurricanes

People who live on Grand Isle have endured decades of destruction, and they've always rebuilt. This time might be different.
A drone boat in a Category 4 storm has its fair share of ups and downs.
A month after Hurricane Ida, small communities along Louisiana’s southeastern coast are still without power or running water.
Some oiled birds have already been rescued from the Alliance Refinery spill, but the operation could take weeks, Louisiana wildlife officials say.
Health officials reported 11 additional deaths in New Orleans on Wednesday, mostly older people who perished from the heat.
Aerial photos released last week showed a miles-wide oil slick on the surface of the Gulf about two miles off Louisiana's coastline.
“Flash floods are now coming. It’s not waves off the ocean or the sound,” New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said soon after last week’s storm swept through.
As Ida approached New York and New Jersey, some people may have been so inundated with weather alerts that they stopped taking them seriously.
After Ida hit Louisiana, mutual aid groups sprang into action to get people the money, food and supplies they needed.
The areas hardest hit by the hurricane might not see full electricity restoration until the end of the month.