JAV on TECH

"Common humanity." A key driving force in this new equilibrium is the role of the media -- and, more specifically, the rise
On Twitter, do you follow people on whose lives -- whose fundamental set of realities -- are completely different than your own? Or have you created a digital echo chamber, following people who already share your interests and already think the way you do?
Like all influential and complex entrepreneurs, Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg is many things to many people. But he is, first and foremost, our young century's first Millennial CEO.
Jumo offers an unprecedented hub for non-profit groups and organizations and announces the arrival of a major player, and possibly a game changer, in an industry that in the past has struggled to innovate and collaborate.
Whatever else The Social Network is, the film represents the biggest culmination yet of old media's disdain and misreading of new media. It's a movie about social networking born out of a fundamental disconnect.
Exactly how has technology changed the journalist's role? This is a golden age for journalism, a time for experimentation, entrepreneurship and creativity. Individual journalists must take full advantage of it.
Technology plays a central role in how the media evolves. That's the underlying theme shared by the winners of the Knight Foundation's Knight News Challenge, which this year awarded $2.74 million to 12 projects.
Judging from the hype that preceded its arrival -- the cover of Time magazine! and Newsweek! endless chatter from media folks looking for a Messiah to technophiles anxious to get their hands on the latest gadget -- you'd think everyone was clamoring for an iPad. Well, not quite.
Forget CPAC. Never mind the DLC. Personal Democracy Forum (PdF) serves as the quintessential hub of examining where politics is headed in our tech-centric, increasingly mobile, socially connected 21st century.
We're living in a transition stage -- a very exciting time in which the "me" in "media" continually and more effectively flexes its muscles. The media's resurrection depends on its understanding of that reality. Not on the shiny, new iPad.