Merrill Lynch

Address your financial past, present and future.
Women physicians have a harder time finding mentors who will support and promote their work, hence the feeling that the men have an exclusive “club."
Big money entering cannabis isn't the end of the world, but it will certainly reshape the world. There is still some time, though. The laws haven't changed yet, and were the law to change tomorrow - even with the current level of research into cannabis - it would likely take most institutions some time to mobilize and jump into the market in earnest.
The legacy of the housing crisis remains firmly in place - largely undiscussed but still potent, hidden deep beneath the surface of contemporary politics. It is a legacy that falls most heavily on the young. Five features of that legacy are particularly relevant now.
Better wages, better health and retirement benefits, better schedules, better training---these are what make "happier Associates." It will take more than clean floors and new name badges to increase worker "ownership." It does not appear that Wal-Mart is anywhere near ready to climb that ladder.
Fresh ideas and approaches can empower a brighter future of aging, and the emergence of financial gerontology is cause for hope. This link between two disciplines that are critically important to the aging population presents the potential for new solutions and healthy, productive and purposeful outcomes for today's older adults and for generations to come.
I fled the Islamic Republic of Iran with a suitcase, a thousand dollars, and no regrets. But it wasn't easy; I had to rebuild my life from scratch. Less than ten years later, I faced a decision that threatened to erase most of what I had accomplished, and I hesitated as I weighed the consequences.
Sadly, we seldom hear of board members standing up and pushing back against management excess.
Simply asserting increased longevity -- that miracle of 20th century science, medicine, technology and health care -- will be a drag on the economy lacks both vision and imagination.
The minimal role of unions in the 21st century prompts us to consider what else does and does not make sense in the workplace when we live healthy, active lives into our 70s, 80s, and 90s. In societies that are defined by more old than young, the traditions that have for decades shaped work need to be reconsidered.