No Impact Week

Let's ditch the the 99% slogan. In these dire circumstances we must be the 100% -- not because it sounds better, but because all 100% of us are deeply intertwined. We have no choice about this, and to start from any other place will leave us missing the fundamental pieces of transformation.
The No Impact Project certainly was a challenge, but I never doubted the worth of the experiment. Deep inside of me I knew it was the right way to live.
Last Rosh Hashanah, I challenged myself to minimize the use of plastic ware and other food related disposables. Did I become no-impact woman? No. However, I made a huge paradigm shift.
On Shavuot, we are reminded that our communal effort to bring healing to the planet and fellow human beings is covenantal work imbued with the spirit of the Divine.
If President Obama wants to set us on a path to a sustainable energy future--and a green one, too--he should propose a very
Colin Beavan: How does "No Impact Man" talk about Progress? When I first heard about Colin's stunt two years ago, I had two
The problem is not the "American" way of life. It is that the way of life in the United States is largely under the control of corporations.
While these eco-capitalists are pouring their blood, sweat, and presumably some tears into the next great industrial revolution, Colin Beavan has a handy list of tips on how you and I can create less trash.
When an alcoholic leaves a bar and drives into his third wreck, do you blame the bartender or the alcoholic? When a society addicted to fossil fuels experiences an oil spill, do you blame the company that drilled for oil or the society that uses it?
Working Films made a short documentary about The No Impact Project, the experiment of Colin Beavan, aka No Impact Man, to