Overfishing

Our agricultural runoff, oil rigs, plastic, fish-glut, and noises are killing the ocean.
By Chris Crowley The Pacific bluefin tuna's situation is so bad in part because 90 percent of those caught in 2013 were too
Better traceability in a notoriously opaque seafood industry could save our oceans, experts say.
At Oceana, we fight for national policies in key countries around the world. We win key victories for the oceans that stop overfishing, reduce bycatch, limit pollution, preserve habitat and protect wildlife.
Since 2014 the US has become a more constructive player in the UN negotiations. Today the need to take action is no less
I was a child of the early 1980s. Looking back, perhaps with a certain ethereal fondness, it seemed like life was simpler, values were different, people were more in tune with their surroundings; and certainly, more in-tune with each other (no cell phones here!).
Greenlanders have experienced some of the good and much of the bad of such “imperial” investment.
Full of vibrant, exciting life and natural beauty, the seas are also vast economic engines and a source of nourishment for our own future generations. With the right policies in place, we can help save the oceans and feed the world.
It's ubiquitous. It's in our food, it's in our beverages, it's everywhere, including the far-reaches of the oceans. Just this week, a statistic came out from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) that 30 percent of all fish have plastic in them. Visibly in them.
From hunter to farmer: A former fisherman is restoring our oceans and rearranging our seafood dinners in the process. After
IN 'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (see links below): CO2's Role in Global Warming Has Been on the Oil Industry's Radar Since the 1960s
"We won't see a presidential candidate like Bernie again in our lifetimes." As I heard these words, spoken by a woman at a Sanders campaign event recently, I felt a chill go through me. Because I knew she was right. We won't.