Rio+20

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The willingness to adapt and change, the curiosity to look beyond and find more to be discovered, more to contribute to, more to advance, more to develop, more to make progress lies within the human arrow of learning and teaching.
The Sustainable Development Goals are about much more than achieving a diplomatic consensus. Starting next year, they will serve as a road-map for driving development around the world, including the world's poorest countries.
Trees are down all over my neighborhood and at night it is pitch dark, with only the moon as light. I feel paralyzed with cold. It is a freezing chill that goes deep to the bone and makes me worried about the future I can have on this planet.
With the clean energy market topping $263 billion globally, and a solar trade war raging, the ending to this tale is crucial for U.S. competitiveness in the technologies of the future.
By the sheer number of initiatives in this arena and the degree to which other efforts are trying to hitch their wagon to the trend, it is clear that something important is afoot. Will merely knowing more about these impacts necessarily lead to dramatically better sustainability outcomes?
While perceptions may differ about the value of the overall outcomes for this year's Earth Summit, I believe most would agree that it is unthinkable to endure another decade marked by inertia in the face of the ongoing collapse of vital ocean ecosystems.
The so-called "green economy," which governments, business leaders, and some environmental organizations touted at last month's summit in Rio de Janeiro, is actually a greenwashed economy.
Last week, the first step was taken at the United Nations to form the working group that will elaborate these goals. As a serious advocate for SDGs, I believe this step is worthy of reflection.
Since returning from Rio, I have already participated in a number of debriefings about the summit. I am pleased to see the interest, but dismayed to find many people have already accepted the message that the Summit had been a "flop" or a "failure."