WWDC

These updates unlock a ton of new potential. And the new features address many of the limitations with iOS that cause me
WWDC kicks off on Monday. For those of you who don't live in Silicon Valley where everyone's buzzing about it, it's Apple's
There is a tech event every week of the year in San Francisco. From the humble meetup groups at the local cafe to the annual circuses that invade the City, events bring people together to share ideas.
Last week, Indians slugger Brandon Moss hit his 100th career home run. Unfortunately for him, the ball landed in the Indian's bullpen, prompting the team's relief pitchers to demand a "shopping list" of Apple products from Moss as a condition for turning over the souvenir.
Apple is getting huge props for a “big” move it made on diversity on Monday. But the company doesn't deserve praise for this. Here's why.
Apple and Google's global workforces are still 70 percent male, and fewer than 10 percent of all computer programmers are
The senior vice president of software, who oversees Apple’s mobile and desktop operating systems, said Monday during a demonstration
Apple revealed some of the most exciting changes to iOS in years at WWDC recently. With an unprecedented number of possibilities of where apps could go, what is this going to all mean for the average user?
Swift has the power of traditional general purpose languages like C and C++, but it also has the elegance of a scripting language like Python. Swift will also attract developers to write software who would have never developed applications for the Mac or iOS platforms.
A WWDC reflection and the top ten things that I think are crucial for iOS developers to learn and become familiar with before the launch of iOS 8.
For developers just entering the Apple development ecosystem, I recommend not throwing away your Objective-C books just yet. In fact, I would recommend learning Objective-C before moving on to Swift.
In spite of the mainstream attention it receives, WWDC is a developer event and understanding the significance of Swift requires knowledge of how iOS apps are commonly developed.
With the internet all abuzz about Apple's new Swift programming language, it seems we've forgotten what language design is about. While Swift may be simpler and more elegant than other languages, it also lacks some very important parts of a programming language - parts that make or break long-term support of the community.
The WWDC may have been short on hardware -- as it almost always is -- but as we spin this story forward, the puzzle pieces Apple is putting in place are beginning to form a rather interesting, lucrative picture.