BRCA Mutation

From life insurance issues to increased anxiety, read about some possible outcomes before you swab.
In January, I found out I had the mutated BRCA1 gene.
The FDA’s recent OK is a step backward for efforts to increase genetic testing access.
And I can relate to Lesley Murphy of “The Bachelor Winter Games.”
"I have this image of strength, power and fearlessness across my chest."
12 women explain why the birth control mandate matters so much.
All of these women are incredible fighters and survivors. And I don't think I'm brave like them. I don't believe I could go through it and be as courageous as they are.
This why Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) includes the creation of a million-person research cohort. Participants
Rather than dwell on what might be taken away, I should be embracing everything I have now.
BRCA mutations in your family might not be evident if you have information only for direct ancestors-- your parents and grandparents. Stronger evidence requires communication among branches of the family to establish a more complete picture.
My sister-in-law didn't get tested for BRCA until she already had cancer. Since it spread so quickly, it was already too late for her. If only one person meets with a genetic counselor because of this blog post, I'll know it was worth writing.
Ask yourself, do you know -- completely and accurately -- your family's health history? Have you looked into those specific diseases that affected your mother, father, aunt or uncle? Have you considered how their experiences may apply to you now and in the future?
I am more than happy to let them feel my new fake boobies and I'll share my intimate details, but my ovaries just aren't up for discussion. Not yet. I understand my boundaries might be confusing to others, but they're mine.
It's an honor to celebrate these women and countless others this month - the 28th annual Women's History month - who uncompromisingly pursued their passions and dreams, often in the face of criticism, stereotypes and stigma.
How exciting to hear the news from this week's State of the Union Address that President Obama has appointed Vice President
The assumption that we can accurately identify who is just at average risk of breast cancer is a dangerous default. Risk is complex, poorly understood, and it's often inconsistently assessed over time.