Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

As the death toll rises, health officials suspect products containing THC are a major factor.
Cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis have risen for the fifth consecutive year in the U.S.
The stores are the latest to stop selling the products as health officials probe a nationwide outbreak of lung illnesses and deaths.
“This is a public health crisis," a lead researcher behind the Mayo Clinic study said.
The CDC's latest figures show a 52% rise in cases since last week. The latest deaths were in Mississippi, Georgia and Florida.
The company's decision follows a wave of vaping-linked illnesses — and several deaths — throughout the nation.
There have been seven deaths and 530 confirmed and probable cases of lung injury linked to vaping, the CDC said Thursday.
The CDC has activated its Emergency Operations Center in response to the mounting illnesses and deaths related to vaping across the country.
Officials said they had identified 450 possible cases of people developing serious breathing illnesses after vaping, including a newly reported death.
The FDA is testing more than 100 samples of cannabis vape products, but said they hadn’t yet found what was causing the spate of illnesses.
The individual experienced symptoms consistent with more than 200 similar cases of respiratory illness, health officials said.
The vast majority of the cases began while migrants were detained, not beforehand.
"We're embarrassed. We're chagrined," one infectious disease expert said of the potential loss of status, 19 years after the disease was declared eliminated.
Health officials are attempting to locate anyone who may have been exposed to the virus or anyone showing symptoms.
On Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control said 149 people nationwide had contracted a severe respiratory illness after vaping.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a sudden spike in severe lung disease cases connected to vaping and e-cigarettes.
Almost 18% of working-age diabetics are skipping meds because of cost.
The federal health agency reported 94 cases in 14 states and said the number is climbing.
There are 12 confirmed cases and 61 probable cases linked to the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, health officials said Monday.
The risk of transmission to humans has increased, health officials said after several chickens tested positive for the Eastern equine encephalitis virus.