Mad Cow Disease

"And after all this, no one ever mentions vegetarianism," said my mom, after we finished watching the 2006 dramedy Fast Food Nation. I stumbled to come up with a response. "At least Avril Lavigne's a vegetarian," I said finally, referring to one of the film's stars.
Doctors then suspected the man had vCJD, and so samples of blood, urine and spinal fluid were sent for testing. The blood
"They're finding bubonic plague on the subway!" a friend recently said to me. "How afraid should I be?" Some subway riders
We must learn from responses to such epidemics in the past if we are to succeed today. Such lessons will be difficult to craft, requiring expertise in culture as well as medicine, but need to be integral parts of our global response.
The incubation period - before initial symptoms surface - can last years, the statement said. After the first sign of symptoms
We must protest the USDA decision to expand meat consumption in schools. It is in youth that one develops eating habits and we dare not set our children off on a path toward uninformed consumption, disease and worse.
"It sounds like science fiction," he concedes on the episode. "But [humans are] doing things like gene splicing, so the theory
By Charles Abbott The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) was expected to formally adopt the recommendation at its
The industry's response to years of evidence of egregious, and often criminal, animal cruelty and of diseased and adulterated meat entering the market is to attempt to outlaw undercover investigations.
The entire pink slime affair should be viewed as a huge wake-up call to the harsh realities of our industrialized meat supply. But Beef Products Inc.'s case against ABC News could scare the media and others out of speaking out against the meat industry.
Americans have less confidence in the quality and safety of their food supply than they had in years, according to a survey by the International Food Information Council (IFIC).
2012-05-09-Screenshot20120509at1.36.03PM.jpgIs eating people dangerous? Nutritional? Healthy? What actually happens, physiologically, when human flesh is consumed?
The Internet of Things takes "dumb" things such as conventional pipeline valves and makes them "smart" by giving each of them an Internet Protocol address combined with wireless transmitting.
In this election year, I've been on fear watch. Folks are fearful of everything from 2012 theories to GMOs to student loans taking over as the number one source of pain for college grads everywhere.
Both BSE and the "pink slime" fiasco are the indirect outcomes of the incessant drive to industrialize livestock farming and meat processing.
It is the meat industry's responsibility to prevent sick animals from entering the food chain in the first place, by instituting a "bright line" ban on the slaughter of all downed livestock.
This recent case of mad cow disease could be an isolated case. It could amount to nothing more than a fleeting news item. That, certainly, is what the U.S. meat industry would like officials to think, and what it would like consumers to believe.
Cattle remains are still fed to chickens and the poultry litter is fed back to cows. In this way, prions -- the infectious proteins that cause mad cow disease -- may continue to cycle back into cattle feed and complete the cow "cannibalism" circuit blamed for the spread of the disease.
The last few months haven't been kind to ground beef. First came the news about pink slime, an ammonia-based filler that