Capital Gazette

The U.S. president lightly suggested "get[ting] rid of" journalists.
The Capital Gazette was given a special citation for its coverage and courage in the face of a massacre in its own newsroom.
Multiple news outlets won awards for coverage of mass shootings in their communities, including the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
The Maryland media company published a newspaper the morning after a gunman killed five of its staffers.
The president tweeted his contempt for the media again, complaining "the press has never been more dishonest."
Photojournalist Joshua McKerrow told NPR that his colleagues are “never going back to the old newsroom.”
Tribune Publishing announces newsrooms to shrink five months after five employees were killed at The Capital Gazette in Maryland.
“If the Baltimore Sun covered it for us, that would mean the shooter wins," Chase Cook told The New Yorker.
The letter was addressed to Eric Hartley, the former Gazette staffer who Jarrod Ramos sued in 2012.
Newsrooms paused their work at 2:33 p.m. EDT, exactly one week after the attack, the deadliest day for U.S. journalists since Sept. 11, 2001.
"We want our readers and our community to see that we believe things will, eventually, be OK again."
The Annapolis mayor said Trump had rejected his request to lower flags on federal buildings.
Accused shooter Jarrod Ramos sent letters to two courthouses in Maryland and a law firm before last week's killings, police said.
Local newspeople don’t get on a plane at day’s end. They go home to the same neighborhoods where their readers live.
“I have been tormented and traumatized and terrorized for so long that it has changed the fiber of my being," she said.
"We won’t forget being called an enemy of the people. No, we won’t forget that," the paper wrote in an editorial published on Sunday.
After the Capital Gazette massacre, one local reporter says she's afraid but undaunted.
It's a pattern we've seen time and time again with mass shooters.