Charles Rangel

Tuesday June 28th was the Democratic Primary for Congressional Candidates in the state of New York. For the past year, since July 1, 2015, I was officially in the race for NY's 13th Congressional District, a formidable candidate for an historic seat held by Charles Rangel for the past 46 years, and prior to him, the late Rev Adam Clayton Powell, Jr, for more than three decades.
Fourteen years ago a terrible thing happened to our country, to our city, when terrorists attacked us on September 11. Then there were no Republicans, there were no Democrats; there were only Americans who said we have to come together.
There has never been a better time than now for the Latino Leadership institute and others like them to be educating young minds and preparing them for the political and social justice battles of the future.
The newly founded Congressional Yogi Association will host its first-ever Yoga on the Hill event on May 1 to advocate for better physical and mental health for veterans, which has also been a prioritized issue for First Lady Michelle Obama. As a Korean War veteran and a staunch advocate for veterans' issues, I have committed to attending the event to show my support.
As our nation's first popularly elected African American Senator, Senator Brooke claimed his seat at the table of government and paved the way for the election of African Americans across the country, including President Barack Obama and me.
Because of the student loan debt crisis, millennials are increasingly delaying investments in houses, not buying cars, and putting off starting a family, which cripples our consumer-driven economy. And perhaps most troubling, they are avoiding graduate and professional school programs.
Speaker Boehner recently questioned President Barack Obama's plan to provide free community college for America's students. Instead of asking how our nation can afford this, we should be asking how our students can afford not to pursue higher education.
Rep Charles Rangel joins HuffPost Live and talks about how he didn't think his slavery comments would make people uncomfortable.
As the U.S. launches its first airstrikes against ISIS, we must ask this crucial question: Who is paying for the war? Because, if indeed it is worth fighting for, all of America needs to chip in and share the sacrifice. It is time to reinstate the draft and a war tax to give everyone a real stake in decisions on war.
On this anniversary, let's remember one great -- but too often overlooked -- Lesbian African-American House Representative from Texas who steered us through a Constitutional crisis 40 years ago with logic and passion.
State Senator Adriano Espaillat has learned a hard lesson. He may have come razor close twice before, but it has to be a bitter pill of why it's so tough to beat an incumbent.
Rep. Charlie Rangel defeated state Sen. Adriano Espaillat in the New York Democratic primary for the 13th Congressional District
MSNBC's Kasie Hunt asked Rangel, also African-American, whether he believed the president faces Republican opposition because
I've been called many things in my time, but there's one in particular I find I'm most proud of: public servant. There's a lot of people out there who think I've served for too long, but I love my community, my city, my state and our great nation too much to quit now. These are critical last two years, and I'm not done fighting yet.
"Senator Espaillat should apologize for making such irresponsible accusations and stick to the issues," King continued. "We
Harlem Rep. Charles Rangel was so eager to launch an academic center in his name at City College that he backed naming a
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act is a massive piece of financial reform legislation that I voted for and was signed by President Obama in 2010. Was it perfect? Of course not. No massive piece of legislation is perfect -- and that's why we constantly work to improve the law.
Espaillat attacked Rangel's 1999 vote to repeal the Glass-Steagall separation between traditional banking and risky securities
As I told the mother interested in sending her daughter to a "safe school," families should look at the written and practiced policies at an institution.
"It's not going to be a difficult election at all," Rangel said at the time. Espaillat, 59, suffered a narrow defeat to Rangel