Geraldine Ferraro

Now, he’s just discarding his position in exactly the same way Al Gore did.
“When we get to that point, I’ll ask you that question,” moderator Dana Bash responded, hinting that the 2020 presidential hopeful's question was off-putting.
Authoritarian leaders talk about closing down the media, going after political foes and being the only source of truth.
For once, stories about the silencing of women won prizes, took the stand and toppled statues.
What I know of Hillary's journey I know only in the context of my lifetime, and it's easy to feel that Hillary has accomplished much of what she's accomplished alone. But the reality is other women ran for both president and vice president before 2008, all aiding in the realization of Clinton's 2016 "clinch."
"On my grave, I want it to say that I was a good mother and that I helped Hillary Clinton become president of the United States in 2016."
If there was a 'revolution' it was Hillary's as many would consider her being the first woman in 240 years to be the nominee of a major political party in the United States and the odds-on favorite to be our 45th President the real revolution.
This morning, I sat with my daughter, Hillary and a bowl of Coco Puffs and talked about all the possibilities of what she can become and achieve, no caveat, no second place...
The historic significance of voting for the first woman nominee to run for president of a major party has been somewhat subjugated
The Republicans know the "woman card" well since they're the ones who invented it. They've been playing it since 1984 when the Democrats nominated Geraldine Ferraro for vice president, the first woman to make it onto the ticket of a major American political party. The Republicans had to deal with the unprecedented event of the sitting vice president, George Herbert Walker Bush, debating the first-ever woman vice presidential candidate. Since 1984, the GOP has seen women as little more than adornments to be used as political slings and arrows. Donald Trump and Ted Cruz are only the latest manifestation. If Hillary Clinton is the nominee the cunning Republican strategists are guaranteed to turn up the volume to eleven on their sexist attacks. They can't help themselves.
Every four years, as the snow flies, politicians who would be President come storming into caucuses, with reporters in their wake. And it can be hard work. Covering nominating conventions entailed four long concentrated days.
At Saturday's Republican debate, the presidential contenders found rare agreement among themselves: women should register
I received an email today from a black elder asking me to reprint a column I wrote for an African American newspaper in April 2008 detailing the persistent racism in the Clinton campaign as it tried to derail Obama's historic run for the presidency. She wanted me to "remind the American people of how far the Clintons had stooped" a mere eight years ago.
There was a striking photograph in Politico a few days ago: the press corps covering Hillary Clinton's campaign. Eighteen reporters posed in the room in which they would watch the first Democratic candidates' debate; all 18 were women.
At her recent press conference at the United Nations, the first question posed to Hillary Clinton, asked by a Turkish reporter, had to do with whether she felt she was being treated differently because she was a woman.
Progressiveness is on the right side of history. Our country has shown time and time again that we move forward, not backwards. This country has been built from our birth on progressive and liberal principles, step by step, striving to improve.
Jason Flom: "I think it was really for the general work that I do. I haven't done a ton of work on the arts side, but I have been involved for over 20 years trying to reform the criminal justice system."
Today marks 30 years since Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman to join a major party's presidential ticket. When she joined Vice President Walter Mondale's presidential ticket in 1984, Geraldine Ferraro didn't just make history, she changed the political world for women.
Although many countries around the world have had a woman as the leader of their government, the U.S. has never had a woman president. Women were running for president, though, even before women had the right to vote.