Hosni Mubarak

The autocrat ruled Egypt for nearly three decades until explosive protests drove him out of power in 2011.
Morsi was elected president in 2012 in the country's first free elections following the ouster the year before of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak.
He was the first leader to face trial after the Arab Spring uprisings that swept the region.
Rachel Aspden’s book Generation Revolution: On the Front Line Between Tradition and Change in the Middle East begins not
In the months after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as president it seemed as though some invisible force was trying to turn what had been a peaceful revolution into a deeply divided and violent one. There were riots, assassinations and acts of arson; all committed by unknown perpetrators.
As we drove there, the revolutionaries discussed their fear of disclosing their identities lest they be arrested. But I had been assured by the prime minister that they would be safe. I trusted him to keep to his word, and my confidence had grown since the snipers had stopped shooting the previous night.
On the night of January 28 - or "Angry Friday" as it became known - mobs of bullies began to circle the protesters gathered at Tahrir Square. On each side of the Square, small groups of 10 to 15 started charging at the demonstrators. It was a test; a way of assessing how those inside the Square would react.
In the years following the events of September 11, 2001, the image of the US in the Middle East was at its lowest. There were demonstrations against the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq in Egypt and elsewhere, along with calls to boycott US products.
As of 2010, there was a strong feeling among the general public that Egypt was approaching a major political, social and cultural overhaul. It was a sentiment that had begun to take root earlier, in 2004. But by 2010, after 30 years in power, the time had come for the presidency to be passed from Mubarak the father to Mubarak the son.
Egyptian Nobel peace laureate Mohamed El Baradei - also self-exiled - tweeted: "Liliane Daoud, ma'am you have gratitude and