Jan Brewer

“They don’t get out and vote. They don’t vote.”
Don't worry. Donald has lots of prominent Americans, representing a broad and diverse spectrum of America, who've endorsed him and can be expected to campaign for him. Here's just a few of those who are likely to stump for Trump. With these folks in his corner, how can he lose?
"To be honest, I find it kind of bizarre that we’re talking about bathrooms in presidential elections.”
"I wonder why we as Republicans want to always eat our own."
Former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer on Saturday endorsed Donald Trump for president. Trump has made immigration a central issue
The sheer size of the Republican field, even at this early date, is downright astonishing. By some calculations, there are over two dozen valid possibilities for the Republican nomination.
When asked whether the respondent hoped there would be a female president, only 16 percent of GOP men and 20 percent of Republican women said yes. Could it be because of Sarah Palin?
America just celebrated the season of giving with Hanukkah and Christmas presents, year-end charity donations and soup kitchen volunteering. It is a time when Americans demonstrate the generosity, caring and kindness that define them as a people. Now, however, Americans may suffer the season of GOP taking.
Many GOP governors who loudly condemned Obamacare are secretly signing up for the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid Expansion. They aren't just Republicans in Democrat states. A growing number are from Southern conservative states, like Alabama and Tennessee.
Mayra Arce even resembles Esperanza, the protagonist in The House on Mango Street, one of the 80-plus books that were part of the Tucson Unified School District's K-12 Mexican-American studies curriculum before the program was dismantled under Arizona House Bill 2281. But Maya isn't the main character of a book. She's the main plaintiff in the lawsuit against Arizona.
"I recognize that what is in state law right now is sufficient," Reagan said. "In 2011, you voted for the birther bill, which
Thanks to a Tar Heel friend who alerted me to issue ads in the North Carolina senate race, I now know that "for six years the policies of Barack Obama and Kay Hagan have dominated Washington." Karl Rove's American Crossroads, you see, is touting Republican Thom Tillis.
Speaking on a Denver radio show Tuesday, Colorado gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez threatened to sue the federal government if it doesn't enforce the nation's immigration laws.
I mean, just over a year ago, he voted with Republicans to overturn the exact same policy. Or to see him last week cite "legal
But as eyebrow-raising as it was, it was actually a defter bit of maneuvering than many politicians, stuck in the middle
What's a politician to do when he or she takes a tough question from a reporter? Well, in general, they do this thing called "dodging the question."