Katrina 10

With opinions surrounding Katrina as widely colored and as deeply layered as our king cakes during carnival season, I did my best not to go into the interview series with a predetermined angle or scope for fear of skewing the story through confirmation bias.
Immigrant workers played a huge part in the relief effort following Hurricane Katrina, so why haven't they been paid yet?
"I've been waiting for 10 years for this, and finally I found her."
Ten years after Katrina, many claim the changes to New Orleans education are a resounding victory. But at what costs? The disadvantaged schools have achieved these score increases by creating an education force led by advantaged, white outsiders, And I was one of them.
Ten years later, the CNN anchor reflects on covering the tragedy.
I watched as the stories came in that covered the destruction, fatalities and the chaos that ensued. And my heart ached for all those who were missing, dead and displaced as a result of this storm and the busted levies. This experience had an impact on me I will never forget.
For days, the media tried to make sense of the tragedy.
Ten years after people were left to fend for themselves post-Katrina, we should all agree that inability to pay cannot mean inability to secure justice. Agreement on this principle, however, is not enough.
This week brought powerful reminders of what happens when a government fails its citizens. On Wednesday, as the nation continued to mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's unnecessarily tragic destruction of a uniquely American city, the nation woke to yet another uniquely American tragedy, as two Roanoke-based news staffers -- reporter Alison Parker, and cameraman Adam Ward -- were gunned down on live television. It was the beginning of a news cycle we know all too well: shock, outrage, calls for sensible guns laws, and then, if past is prologue, nothing. Since the Newtown shootings in 2012, nearly 85,000 Americans have been killed by guns -- yet common sense gun legislation proposed at the time by President Obama continues to languish. On Thursday, the president called Katrina "a man-made disaster, a failure of government to look out for its own citizens." The same could be said of Roanoke.
New Orleans became a symbol of American rebirth and reinvention in the face of senseless tragedy. From dramatically improving results in its public schools to rebuilding its civil infrastructure, the city has taken many impressive and forward-looking steps since Katrina.
It's been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall, the people of New Orleans have spent a decade rebuilding their city, but not everyone has felt the full impact of the recovery effort. But don't be too discouraged. We found five innovations that are improving the lives of citizens across the board.
I spoke with Wendell Pierce - most famous for his HBO series roles in The Wire and Treme - on the closing weekend of Brothers from the Bottom, a critically-acclaimed play about gentrification in New Orleans after the storm, in which Pierce played a lead role both on stage and in production.
The President did the right thing by going to struggling neighborhoods and spending time with the young people who could see in a man who, through the dedication, love and hard work, a mirror of themselves and what they too could accomplish.
"We gotta have some heart-to-heart conversations based on these statistics and say, 'What can we do ... to really close the achievement gap?'"
Despite the various narratives of progress, black and brown kids across our city--almost regardless of school, age, neighborhood, or income--are punished, threatened, failing, and producing predictable, vilified, low test scores. This is no surprise to any of us--not a one.