Libya Protests

  TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — A court in Libya on Tuesday sentenced a son of Moammar Gadhafi to death by firing squad after convicting
The Economist recently highlighted the contrast between post-revolt Asian societies and Middle Eastern and North African societies in the woes of a pro-longed, messy and bloody transition that is pockmarked by revolt and counter-revolt, sectarianism, the redrawing of post-colonial borders, and the rise of retrograde groups as revolutionary forces.
You heard it here, the former Secretary of State, Hillary Rodham Clinton was right. Like she said, "what does it matter?". What does matter is that the Congress is wasting our time and money rehashing rhetoric instead of reason.
Libyans want to put the Qadhafi era behind them, but they also want capable individuals to draft the constitution, keep the lights on and the oil flowing. To achieve this they need a strong, moderate leadership.
Though unidentified in the video, the men responsible for the lashing are reported by al-Arabiya to be members of Ansar al
Contemporary Libya is clearly a nation in the making, rather than just a conglomeration of tribes ready to be at each other's throat. Libyans, however, are still experiencing some conflicts.
Did everyone in the free world all of a sudden forget that it was not the Obama administration but the protestors on the ground in Libya who actually first stated that the reason they were protesting was because of the anti-Islam video, Innocence of Muslims?
During the Bush years, the Republicans used to say it was unpatriotic to criticize the commander-in-chief when troops were in harm's way -- that it would endanger the lives of our soldiers and damage morale. But this deeply heart-felt declaration of wartime patriotism has now been completely abandoned.
Sen. John McCain (R- Ariz.) on Sunday compared the growing debate over what the Obama administration knew about the crisis
This juggling act would pose a nerve racking challenge to any GOP or Democrat occupant of the Oval Office. The tight walk demanded that a president be flexible, deft, and attuned to fast changing conditions and players in the Middle East.