Marissa Alexander

Just days after returning to the U.S. a story broke an hour south of where I was living in Florida, involving a naked man eating the face off another in a shocking attack of cannibalism like The Walking Dead come to life. Toto, I don't think I'm in Europe anymore.
No one can deny black men's vulnerability in this society and the recent killings of Walter Scott and Eric Harris are painful reminders, but the fact is black women suffer the same injustices. Silence in mainstream and black America is the only reason why it isn't widely acknowledged.
The relative victory of Marissa is that she is the one who lived. And she lives precisely because she knew her life mattered. Even if no one else believed it to be so.
Connecting community violence to the movement for accountability for police brutality would help call attention to the disproportionate violence experienced by all kinds of black women, and girls and it would also create a space to more closely interrogate the detrimental aspects of police abdication on black communities.
On Tuesday, January 27, 2015, Marissa Alexander walked out of jail, but not as a free woman. At yesterday’s hearing, the
For change to happen, we must focus our resources on mechanisms of support. There is another way forward that does not involve punishment or jail. It's time to stop criminalizing victims and provide help instead.
Leaving the courthouse, Alexander cried as she thanked her supporters, sharing plans to continue her education in order to
On January 27, domestic violence survivor Marissa Alexander will walk out of Florida's Duval County jail -- but she won't be free.
Many of the condemnations of police brutality have excluded the experiences of black women who have been brutalized in custody. The ongoing media blackout surrounding the case of 13 black women allegedly assaulted by a police officer in Oklahoma City may be the hardest evidence of the devaluation of African-American women's lives.
When someone we love is robbed from us, it feels like the world should stop. Actually, it does. For a moment. And we look around us, jealous that others are still living, working and being alive.
On Monday a grand jury chose not to indict Officer Darren Wilson, the white police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, in August. Innumerable people were immediately outraged, erupting in fury. The criminal justice system must be reformed to promote civil rights for African Americans.
Marissa Alexander, the Florida woman facing a retrial for charges of aggravated assault after she said she fired a warning shot at her abusive husband, has agreed to a plea deal.
Alexander's conviction was overturned last year on appeal, and her retrial was set to begin next week in Jacksonville. It
In a move that could bolster 34-year-old Marissa Alexander’s case, a judge ruled this week that evidence prior alleged acts
The possibility of being imperfect -- of making mistakes -- without dire consequences is in some respects the very definition of privilege. For only some groups need to fear that they may trip the wire of state-sanctioned violence at any moment.
The new warning shot law was prompted by controversy over Alexander's conviction and sentencing in 2012 to 20 years in prison
"The new law, as it stands now, allows you to claim immunity from prosecution if you used or threatened deadly force," Attorney
The warning shot measure has enjoyed some bipartisan support in light of the high-profile case of Marissa Alexander. The
The dynamics of domestic violence are complex and changing them requires not just one thing to change, but many things simultaneously.
Of all the categories of victims who might justifiably agitate for more protection from the law, women facing down abusive partners in their own homes should be at the top of the list. And yet Stand Your Ground laws do nothing to help them. This is not by accident but by design.