Mauritania

Image source: Le Figaro To me, the moral of these stories is that Mauritania is what it is. Only two generations ago, most
Modern slavery can feel far removed from "ordinary" people, as can the fight to end it. That must change. We are voters, we
Corruption diverts resources from the poor to the rich, leads to a culture of bribes, and distorts public expenditures, deterring foreign investors and hampering economic growth. But, in some ways, corruption is only a symptom.
Leaders of the world are coming together in London this week for all the right reasons: As the violence continues unabated, stoking more turmoil in an already restive region, standing by the Syrians is unquestionably our collective duty.
Given the conflicting interests and lack of military experience on the part of the coalition's members, there is ample reason to conclude that this alliance lacks substance.
Eight photojournalists who have traveled the world to capture the lives of refugees are selling their work in collaboration
Ba Papa Amadou has played a leading role in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) in Mauritania for over eight years.
With less than four million inhabitants, widespread illiteracy and a long history of authoritarian rule by military strongmen, Francophone Mauritania seems an unlikely breeding ground for think tanks.
According to a recent World Bank study, fisheries make up one quarter of Mauritania's natural wealth, but the waters off the country in north-western Africa are being overfished. Foreign operators pull out the lion's share of the catch - sometimes legally, sometimes not; suspicions of corruption abound.
About 10 to 20 percent of Mauritania's population lives in slavery. The government did abolish the practice 20 years ago, made it a criminal offense in 2007 subject to punishment, but it has failed to genuinely tackle the problem, and the practice continues.