Mayor Richard M. Daley

Five years ago, on September 15, 2010, a group of mothers began a sit-in at Whittier Elementary School in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood. The mothers took this action only after trying unsuccessfully for years to get a library for their kids' school.
The study of relevant history can shed insight into present-day events, even if the specific details may differ. With that in mind, it may be worthwhile to look at four historical Chicago mayoral campaigns as Karen Lewis sets her sights on Rahm Emanuel.
Koschman, 5'5" and 125 pounds, got "mouthy" and a 6'3", 230 pound ex-football player punched him in the face. Koschman, knocked unconscious, fell backward to the ground, where the back of his head crashed against the pavement.
"I'm looking for someone to explain justice," said Grace Slattery to a reporter. Slattery was lamenting the comparatively stiff prison sentence her son Patrick had received for his part in a patronage scandal under ex-Mayor Richard M. Daley.
For the first time in 35 years, Anthony McKinney was no longer in the custody of the State. Since 1978, McKinney had been imprisoned at the Dixon Correctional Center despite overwhelming evidence of his innocence. But death proved to be his only way out.
Sometimes you need a flowchart to understand all the connections between public figures in Illinois. That certainly could be useful in the case of the suit filed by Senate President John Cullerton and House Speaker Michael Madigan against Gov. Pat Quinn.
There is an upcoming test case which that help to determine whether nepotism is actually dying in Illinois, or if it is poised to come roaring back. This pass/fail test is for Mayor Rahm Emanuel.
To compete on an even playing field, we need to create our own field with teammates that respect and support what it takes for us to be healthy and whole.
Richard M. Daley plans to donate more than $500,000 worth of leftover campaign funds to charity, a spokeswoman for the former
Once again, it appears to be "business as usual" when it comes to police brutality, the code of silence, and official cover-up in Chicago.