Muqtada al-Sadr

The "million-man" march was called for by an influential Shiite cleric, though their numbers fell short of a million.
Sadr has led two uprisings against U.S. forces in Iraq and is one of the few Shi’ite leaders to distance himself from Iran.
Dozens of people incurred injuries from tear gas and live fire, witnesses said
As some see Muqtada Al Sadr as both a political and militant proxy of Iran, his recent political revival may seem as though Iran sees to further expand its influence in Iraqi politics for strategic purposes.
Supporters of a prominent Shi'ite cleric are demanding government reform.
"The war in Iraq will soon belong to history," proclaimed President Obama as he marked the occasion of bringing the last troops home. But while the military chapter of that disastrous undertaking might belong to history, its consequences belong very much to the present.
Nine years after the invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein, the United States withdrew its forces from Iraq in December, with
The State Department is operating one of the largest U.S. embassies in the world in Baghdad, but the number of American combat forces in Iraq is zero. How long will it stay that way?
In today's parlance, Iraq looks like a war that was brought to us by the 1 percent, for the 1 percent, and attempting to further some ill-defined geopolitical goal of the 1 percent.
If the future of Iraq seems confusing, it is in part due to the fact that nobody seems to know the mind of Moqtada al-Sadr -- including Sadr himself.