National Intelligence Agency

The move contradicts the military’s own assessments going back to 1990.
Russia and the U.S. return to a “normal” state of icy hostility, a top analyst writes. Ousting Assad would lead to “brutal civil conflict,” a former CIA operative says.
In 11 years, the first nuclear weapon since 1945 will be used in a conflict and China and America will defuse the crisis.
Since 9/11, expansion has been the name of its game, as the leading intelligence agencies gained ever more power, prestige, and the big bucks, while wrapping themselves in an unprecedented blanket of secrecy.
Concern over the small European nation's ability to handle its worsening Islamic militant threat came to the fore following Tuesday's ISIS attack.
The U.S. is once again in the midst of an inward turn. Unlike the disconnection following the First World War, America's growing national deficit in the capacity and will to engage other people not like them is not the innocent confidence of a rising power but the false bravado leading one to its fall.
While there is nothing new about espionage or hacking, the size and depth of these attacks make them extremely serious. The ubiquity of technology and poor security have caused both crime and surveillance to skyrocket in frequency and specificity.
While we, the citizens of the U.S., remain in legal America, the U.S. national security state exists in "post-legal America" because no illegal act from warrantless surveillance to torture committed in its service will ever be prosecuted.
Obama ordered a declassified report be prepared for public release before any military strike commences. That report, top
Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), a fervent opponent of the National Security Agency's surveillance program, admitted that he considered leaking the program in an interview with Rolling Stone published on Thursday.