Nicolas Berggruen Institute

Nicolas Berggruen was once known as the "homeless billionaire," a globe trotter who traveled to many cities around the world
To put the Middle Kingdom's soft power in context, while China is building bullet trains to connect 80 percent of its cities, half of all Indians still lack toilets. China's newly aggressive posture in the East and South China Seas, not to mention its commercial cyberspying, threaten to undermine that soft power. This is not to say that China is singularly at fault or that some of its claims are not legitimate and that others, especially Japan, are not culpable in raising tensions. Everyone now also knows that American NSA cyberspying is globally pervasive. But it is to say that much of the rest of the world perceives a new confrontational tone in Beijing.
Mario Monti, prime minister of Italy from 2011 to 2013 during the height of the euro crisis, is chairman of the Berggruen
The Berggruen Institute on Governance (BIG) is hosting the international conference Project Europe, which will bring together
If invested with popular legitimacy, Europe's success will depend on balancing it with long-term focused meritocratic governance and avoiding capture by short-term and particular special interests. A middle Way between West and East is indeed necessary.
Its time to update the genius of America's Founding Fathers to fit our present circumstances. If we can't manage to be equal to their spirit, the democracy they so carefully crafted is bound to falter.
Symbolically, the Oslo ceremonies are an historical turning point for Europe. By recognizing the European Union's peacemaking past, the Nobel Prize challenges Europe to escape once and for all the destructive pull of narrow national interests and passions.
When the European Union was only an idea, a fantastic object, it was conceived as an instrument of solidarity. Today, Europe hangs together out of grim necessity. That is not conducive to a harmonious partnership.
My recent experience in dealing with the financial crisis in Greece and in Europe has confirmed my belief that this is a political crisis more than a financial one. In trying to confront its fiscal deficit, Europe has run up a democratic deficit.
Turkey today is strong and resilient. But there is more to be done to improve our performance and build proactively on this foundation.
Europe is at a crossroads. The wider European Union needs to decide whether to promote growth, speak with a common voice on global issues and play a significant global role in the 21st century -- or to accept that the world will move on without Europe.
I shall resist the temptation of being the Brit outside the euro trying to tell everyone inside why it was a bad idea. First, because I don't think it is a bad idea. In principle, a single currency along with a single market makes sense for Europe. Second, because in any event, we are where we are.
At the Council on the Future of Europe, the dominant note was of nervousness at the state of Spain's financial system, combined with resolve to rally German opinion behind greater fiscal coordination and debt mutualization.
Members of the Nicolas Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council met on May 6 in Mexico City with Mexican President Felipe Calderon, chair of this year's G-20 Summit, to discuss the upcoming issues for the G-20 agenda.
The cracks that are beginning to appear in the opaque machinations of the Chinese Communist Party are yielding some new clues that clarify the forces at work behind the purge of Chongqing's populist leader Bo Xilai.
In our age, the advent of social networks and the transparency of shared networks challenge all hierarchies from monopoly of the mainstream media to professional knowledge protected by credentials, such as doctors, to dictators protected by force.