Pentagon Papers

Tom Hanks says it’s time to start “weighing things” while talking about his newest film, “The Post.”
Stanely will be sorely missed. If ever I thought of cloning a person, it would have been him. So much to offer from a man who gave his wit, his love, his passion to all that surrounded him, a man who truly believed that a better world had to be possible.
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, who was a close second in a recent straw poll of Wisconsin Democrats, has called for a "political revolution" to revitalize democracy in the United States. Is Sanders ready to walk the walk?
Without whistleblowers, citizens are at the mercy of massaged truths and fine-crafted fictions spun by officials who prefer shadows to sunlight.
While Daniel Ellsberg, his compatriot and companion in revelation, remains a major figure for his role in releasing the Pentagon Papers, Tony Russo is a forgotten man. That's too bad. He shouldn't be forgotten. His is, unfortunately, a story of our times as well as his.
Everyone who has an opinion on the Edward Snowden revelations should watch this film. Everyone who has an opinion on the USA PATRIOT Act should tune in. Disturbed by the National Security Agency's actions? Check your local listings for when the PBS show Independent Lens airs. I say all this, mind you, before I've even seen the film.
The Johnson administration was looking for a pretext to escalate the war. "We don't know what happened," National Security Adviser Walter W. Rostow told the president after Congress passed the resolution, "but it had the desired result."
The Obama administration is toying with whether to send New York Times reporter James Risen to jail for refusing to reveal a source involved in a federal leak investigation dating back to 2006.
This was a historic burglary, to put it mildly. It was also the first time modern newspapers were faced with the ethical question of whether to publish news stories which had as their sole source stolen government documents that arrived anonymously in the mail.
Forty-three years ago this month, an obscure branch office of the Federal Bureau of Investigations located in a Philadelphia suburb was burgled. All their files were stolen (being 1971, these files were all on paper) and whisked away to a secret hideout, then they were sorted and sent to the media.
Given the recent history of clandestine government operations against American citizens like Martin Luther King, there's good reason to reason to be worried about the future of liberty in America.
Most of those making the case that Snowden should "return to the United States and face the music in a court of law" regularly offer up (as an example for how whistleblowers should act) the story of Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers. But a better parallel exists.
Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Tuesday for handing WikiLeaks a massive cache of sensitive government
In fact, there is nothing to stop the U.S. government from censoring the media with regard to revelations such as those contained in the Snowden files -- nothing, that is, except longstanding tradition.
Cullen Hoback's film takes us down a rabbit hole to try and answer the question: Is privacy dead? In the process, he exposes us to a massive civil liberties nightmare.
Our lawmakers, including the president, talk about their Christian faith often. Yet, the president's administration is doing
When Ellsberg leaked state secrets from the McNamara Report to the press, he went into hiding in his Cambridge home. Two weeks later, he turned himself in. He did what Senator Dianne Feinstein ordered Snowden to do, "come back and face the music."
Cracked is one thing but, contrary to my first impressions, Snowden and Palin are smart, even cunning. Like a Fox. Who cares if you're cracked? There's a fortune to be made in fanatics.