Tahrir Square

Mohamed Amashah, 24, was arrested after standing alone in Cairo’s Tahrir Square with a sign that read: “Freedom for all the political prisoners.”
The "million-man" march was called for by an influential Shiite cleric, though their numbers fell short of a million.
In the months after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as president it seemed as though some invisible force was trying to turn what had been a peaceful revolution into a deeply divided and violent one. There were riots, assassinations and acts of arson; all committed by unknown perpetrators.
After the war ended, the bitterness between the two men continued. Wanting to remove el-Shazly from the army, Sadat made
As we drove there, the revolutionaries discussed their fear of disclosing their identities lest they be arrested. But I had been assured by the prime minister that they would be safe. I trusted him to keep to his word, and my confidence had grown since the snipers had stopped shooting the previous night.
On the night of January 28 - or "Angry Friday" as it became known - mobs of bullies began to circle the protesters gathered at Tahrir Square. On each side of the Square, small groups of 10 to 15 started charging at the demonstrators. It was a test; a way of assessing how those inside the Square would react.
It was more than an hour later, at almost 5pm on Friday, January 28 -- a day branded "Angry Friday" -- when the police stopped shooting at the demonstrators who were gathered outside the offices of Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper.
We had walked just 200 yards from Al-Ahram when the security forces, appearing from the side streets, suddenly closed in on us and began firing. Snipers were also targeting us. Myself, Ibrahim and many other demonstrators picked up the wounded and carried them back to the lobby of Al-Ahram.
COPENHAGEN -- Egypt's president said to the family of the murdered Italian student, "We'll find who killed Giulio." For Italians, those words were followed only by deception and delays.
When you're ready to strike out and start exploring what you came to Egypt to see and explore, take my advice and hire a
Ben Arnon (BA): Are you scared when you're in the middle of an intense scene making photographs? What is going through your
Sondos Shabayek discovered her passion for theater during the Egyptian revolution in 2011. Now, she’s using it to tackle gender inequality.
CAIRO -- I had a dream like any other Egyptian. I lived through the unforgettable moment when Mubarak was obliged to cede the throne. I was waiting for a new Egypt, for a different future to come. Now, we are living through the worst moments Egypt has ever lived. Yet even in this complex reality, we still have hope.
Khaled Fahmy shares his memories of Egypt's uprising, five years after Tahrir.
Clinging listlessly to the top of the pole in the middle of Tahrir Square the Egyptian flag projects absolute power, a signal of the old order restored after the mass anti-government uprising of 2011.
Although deliberately and viciously abated by dictatorships, it is worthy to say that the Arab Spring revolutions have proven that the youth never lost hope in changing their present in order to own the future.
Egypt looks nothing like the promised heaven of stability and cohesiveness. Scores of Egyptians have been murdered by an ever more rampant police, sentenced to death in kangaroo courts, or jailed in the most inhumane conditions where torture is routine. Dissent is not tolerated, with the media and the press reduced to the role of state propagandists singing the General's praises and parroting his words.
I believe in a future in which Muslim spiritual leaders and Islamist activists no longer view their faith or their fellow Muslims in these terms -- and where those Westerners who believe in fairness, equality and justice for all open their hearts to all the peoples of the region, not just a privileged few.