United States Department of Commerce

President Donald Trump announced that his administration will be dropping their effort to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, and will instead be instructing other executive agencies to provide all of their citizenship records to the Department of Commerce.
Charles C. Johnson, a Holocaust denier, had a surprising and markedly informal exchange with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in 2018.
The commerce secretary faced scrutiny over the process he used to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Two judges have already said it's illegal.
Adding a citizenship question to the census could be one of the Trump administration's most flagrant and consequential scandals.
The plaintiffs say the administration's justification for adding the question is just a pretext to use the count to discriminate.
A judge ruled illegal the axing of a plan to limit the number of marine creatures allowed to be killed by drift gillnets used to catch swordfish off California.
The Commerce Department has ordered that water use be prioritized for firefighters -- who say water isn't the issue. The decision isn't really about fire.
There was enough evidence the decision could have been discriminatory to move the case forward.
New documents show Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross wanted to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census months before there was a formal request.
The government must disclose additional documents from the Commerce and Justice departments explaining the decision.
A recent disclosure raises big questions about Ross' explanation for why a citizenship question is being added to the 2020 census.
Senators and human rights groups worry the proposed rule changes will export the U.S. gun violence epidemic.
Charges against Sherry Chen were dropped, but the Commerce Department still fired her.
"They have made a political decision. And they have every right to do that because they won the election,” Thomas Brunell said.
ZTE pleaded guilty last year to conspiring to violate U.S. sanctions by illegally shipping U.S. goods and technology to Iran.
The proposed question raised concerns that minority communities would be discouraged from responding, leading to less congressional representation and federal funding.
We should not allow vital information about who lives in America to become a political tool.
States with large immigrant populations stand to lose seats in Congress, federal funding and electoral college votes.
Civil rights groups say the question is untested and could depress response rates among minorities.
Kelly Rzendzian worked on message planning for the presidential campaign before joining the Commerce Department, she wrote in her resume.