113th-congress

These are trying times for concerned politicians and citizens alike. They are times in which the odd has become the ordinary. These are times in which the extreme has become the usual. These are times in which the virtual has become the real.
Even if outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid does not schedule a floor debate on an AUMF this week, as is likely, at least the Foreign Relations Committee will have gotten the ball rolling by voting and passing a resolution. That's the most Americans can hope for from the 113th Congress.
Since last November, Senate obstruction hasn't disappeared, it simply has taken a different form.
As observers of human rights violations, we have noted sustained levels of injustice and deprivation against minorities. We maintain that fundamental violations of human rights in Iran stem from discriminatory laws that have become institutionalized and perpetuated structural violence.
Women in Congress - Over Time | FindTheBest Women in Congress by State - Total Historical | FindTheBest American voters brought
"The waiver guidance issued today says: No Child Left Behind failed, but you can get out of it if you have college- and career
If we decide elections why don't the issues we care about advance once the candidates we elect take office? In a system of representative government, shouldn't elected officials serve my interests once elected? They should, but women need to play a greater role in making sure they do.
As for some popular items that Democrats tried to use in their re-election message -- such equal pay for women who do the
A year ago, Americans were chomping at the bit for an opportunity to vote against those responsible for the government shutdown that cost the government and businesses an estimated 24 billion in lost economic output.
Dear women voters: It's our time, ladies. A midterm election looms, and the focus is on us! Politicians and pundits alike know that there's no crossing the electoral finish line without women voters in their corner. But are the candidates seeking to represent us talking about the issues we care about?
As we face the rugged terrain ahead, our marching orders must be the sobering words that speak presciently from the grave of the late Coretta Scott King: "Struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation."
As we witness the drug and criminal justice policies of the "greatest democracy in the world" lag behind those of an ever expanding list of other countries around the world, more and more are coming down on the right side of history.
This move could result in the release of thousands of low-level federal inmates caught up in the drug war. For a president who, hitherto, had the most conservative pardon record in recent history (e.g. in Obama's first term, he pardoned 1 in 50 applicants, while Ronald Reagan pardoned 1 in 3), such a shift is noteworthy.
What changes have come about since our #EndMassIncarceration petition? Well, there's been about 20 developments and victories in the way of criminal justice reform (not including changes at the state/local level), at least 6 of which that are having or will have measurable impact.
At the core of all of this is an ignominious reality at odds with one of the nation's most (publicly) cherished ideals, and one of our Constitution's most sacred laws: the Fourteenth Amendment right to "equal protection of the laws."
In the end, we're still faced with a problem: the President can't do it all. He can't re-authorize the LWCF nor can he appropriate it the money it deserves. We need Congress to act on LWCF and pass the dozens of currently-stalled conservation bills.
The 112th Congress, which ended its term on January 3, 2013, was labeled the "worst" and "least productive" Congress ever by a variety of sources.
Back in July, govtrack.us compiled some numbers showing how this Congress stacks up to previous ones. At 506 days into its