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Recently, I interviewed the Co-founder & Chief Technology Officer, Adam Becker, of The Department of Better Technology (DOBT). DOBT is dedicated to making great software that helps governments and nonprofits better serve their communities.
Government employees are used to "fighting with" the software that they are mandated to use on a daily basis. At DOBT, our
A new government website is helping Americans make more educated decisions about where they go to college.
Is tech making government work better? That was the question tackled by an expert panel at the Techonomy Policy conference in Washington in early June. The summary answer: a little bit, but not nearly as much as it could.
Part of the problem with Healthcare.gov was not that we didn’t have a lot of hardworking people paying attention to it, but
"Unencrypted HTTP connections create a vulnerability and expose potentially sensitive information about users of unencrypted
"This doesn't yet fill the most ambitious FOIA-related commitment in the U.S. Open Government Partnership National Action
Improvement can be sweeping, or incremental. In my case, it started with a nibble in 2012 when former U.S. CTO Todd Park tweeted he was "looking for a few good women and men to serve their country" as part of a new program called the White House Presidential Innovation Fellows (PIFs).
This is a positive move that deserve to be supported at any level: better privacy protection and strong security are mandatory steps toward a digital society shaped around people's needs and easily-accessible public services.