1930s

THE ANGELS' SHARE is published by Thomas Nelsons. It contains 320 pages and sells for $15.99. A few weeks ago I was watching
One of Conaty's favorite singers, Annette Henshaw, would sign off each song saying, "That's all." And it is. It's over. Even
And I will mention people both from pop culture and important historical figures. And I will be purposefully mentioning only
Lifetime stepped up its game a few weeks ago when they presented the mini-series "War & Peace." It was a beautifully crafted and acted event. Now Lifetime is bringing us "And Then There Were None" based on Agatha Christie's classic novel.
The media frenzy surrounding Donald Trump has inverted the nature of our problem. That a demagogue will come along to foment dissent is no surprise; that his despicable views find such gleeful resonance with so many of our voters is the frightening story, not Trump.
n the Europe of the 1920s and 1930s, child rearing conventions were centered on not 'spoiling' the children with affection and freedom. We were never kissed nor told we were loved. I shook hands with my parents and curtsied when greeting adults. Respectful, quiet, and obedient.
When my grandmother called my father to say that a redheaded girl had been born, he just hung up, disappointed. He had hoped for a boy. My mother called me Natasha after her favorite character in Tolstoy's 'War and Peace.'
All families should be lucky enough to have an 'Oma', a character, full of talents that makes us ordinary mortals feel somewhat...well, ordinary.
In our New Jersey attic, there is precisely one hat, standing in immense and ghostly isolation beneath a tent of blue Indian gauze, its custom-made hat-stand crafted by a friend in Up-country South Carolina about 20 years ago.
Today there is only one spot in Los Angeles that remembers Dorothy Parker's 30 years as a resident.
In the years to come these moguls found their way out to California, settled in a little town called Hollywood, and built an empire that occupies a space in all of our hearts and minds in some way or another.
To me, the interest lies in the depiction of these chefs -- who were at the top of their profession -- not as grease-spattered toilers in steamy basement kitchens but as dignified artisan-managers. As we think of chefs today, they were figures to be admired as creators, not despised as servants.
Rout 7 is U.S. highway, but it doesn't read like it was ever a road for moving goods or getting where you need to go.
In the 1930s, the nursery of the future was filled with visions of metallic finishes and nannies that would inspire nightmares -- at least, that's what this display from the 1930 Ideal Home Exhibition would suggest.
One particular product makes this a very child-unfriendly space.
It's remarkable to think that a relatively traditional name era like the 1930s could actually follow celebrity names more than our own age does.