2014 elections

At least on the television airwaves, Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., is facing what's perhaps the end of her political career
The best thing Republicans had going for them in this election was the fact that they weren't in the same party as President Obama. But it would be a huge mistake for them to act as though this was an endorsement of their policies -- a mistake they seem likely to make. A mistake that seems destined to be part of the 2016 Republican autopsy.
Luckily for those who won't be returning to Congress -- the tally is 75 -- their power and influence is more sought after than ever, and many "fail up." For them, the days of being lobbied are over. Now some will make the classic switch, joining the ranks of the lobbyists of K Street.
  Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., is also throwing a "thank you reception" on Dec. 10 at Del Frisco's Grille in D.C. While those
The voting turnout in this year's congressional and gubernatorial elections was the lowest since 1942. Much of the story was in young people, poor people, black and Hispanic citizens who tend to support Democrats voting in far lower numbers than in 2008 or 2012. The Democrats just weren't offering them very much. But the other part of the Election Day story was older voters and the white working class, especially men, deserting the Democrats in droves -- again, because Democrats didn't seem to be offering much. Republicans, at least, were promising lower taxes. Turnout on average dropped from 2012 by a staggering 42 percent. But as Sam Wang reported in a post-election piece for the American Prospect, the drop-off was evidently worse for Democrats. The two parts of this story seem to create an impossible conundrum for Democrats.
Obama shouldn't "poison the well"? Really?
In the wake of the midterm elections, Republicans said they would prove they could govern. This did not, in contrast to the
In the wake of the midterm elections, Republicans said they would prove they could govern. This did not, in contrast to the
The border district at stake, which covers the eastern half of Tucson, is divided between Republican-heavy Cochise County
Democrats have historically been the party of Social Security and the champion of the middle class -- so what happened?
Hey, Candidates: How'd that whole "Abandoning Obama" thing work out for you?
Rather than stand and fight, the Democratic National Committee decided to run away and decouple their reelection campaign from the very visible, 24/7 presence of President Obama. This was their "playbook" for holding or increasing Democratic Party seats in the House and Senate. How did that work out?
For the White House’s defenders, the argument remains the same regardless of the numbers: By running away from the president
Throughout the night, pundits spent their time talking about Republican wins and Democratic defeats, though the latter was still able to salvage some wins. But the biggest thing many in the media seemed to miss was the biggest loser: discrimination.
In the coming weeks, Hillary Rodham Clinton will stop delivering paid speeches. Read more on The New York Times
The 2014 gubernatorial elections were supposed to sweep in Democrats who would lead the charge for Medicaid expansion in
What may seem like a surprisingly fast turn toward legalization has actually been a long, slow movement against pot's prohibition -- one that began in the early 1960s, peaked in the late '70s, and then failed to secure a single major victory again until the late '90s.
Jody 'Abortion Is Worse Than Hitler' Hice Saira 'NRA-Endorsed College Freshman' Blair Glenn Grothman, a Wisconsin Republican
While big donors like Tom Steyer and the Democratic Party insiders running Democratic-leaning outside spending groups might not be celebrating over it now, big money -- even losing big money -- matters in Washington.