2014 midterms

Full-throated support for public education should be a no-brainer for Democratic candidates. They should tout their support for neighborhood schools, while pointing out how their Republican opponents want to slash funding and resources.
If President Barack Obama’s year ended in November, it would have been one of the worst of his presidency. Read more on Politico
Facebook is in a peculiar and unenviable position -- no matter what its intentions are, even minor decisions will have political impacts.
It would be in the public interest to re-examine the hundreds of millions spent on buying TV time, considering that those TV airwaves are already the public's.
If the new GOP leadership debuts by substituting a crusade against environmental protection and Obama for jumpstarting the economy, it won't be too long before many voters experience buyer's remorse.
I am a Democrat. My small "d" democratic bent encourages me to try to see the best in people, even politicians from the opposing party. But I have rarely witnessed the kind of bare-knuckled politicking that occurred during these mid-term elections.
Ironically, many if not most of the issues rural and urban folks care about are the same: good jobs, economic growth, a sound environment, and access to decent and affordable health care. But the urban/rural divide has become a steep one over the past two decades and it is often overlooked.
Rather than stand and fight, the Democratic National Committee decided to run away and decouple their reelection campaign from the very visible, 24/7 presence of President Obama. This was their "playbook" for holding or increasing Democratic Party seats in the House and Senate. How did that work out?
You can call it a "wave," a "thumpin'," or a "shellacking," but whatever term that the pundits and politicians use, it's quite clear that the Republican Party made a loud statement on Election Night.
What may seem like a surprisingly fast turn toward legalization has actually been a long, slow movement against pot's prohibition -- one that began in the early 1960s, peaked in the late '70s, and then failed to secure a single major victory again until the late '90s.
Too many Democrats did not make a clear and convincing case about the consequences of policies pushed by far-right activists and promoted by Republican elected officials. And that allowed the debate to become a referendum on voters' feelings about Barack Obama.
This podcast was edited by Ibrahim Balkhy and sound engineered by Brad Shannon, with assistance from Christine Conetta, Chris
The Obama Administration will commit substantial resources of $50-100B to a sweeping effort to address the foreclosure crisis
Pundits have speculated that Cruz may be considering vying for the seat himself. Cruz also remained tight-lipped about his
"It's never too late," she told the station. "Here I am at my age still fighting, and you won't even vote?" 102-year-old
A recent Harvard University poll shows that only 26 percent of young Americans under the age of 30 intend to vote in this
In thinking about 2014, a more telling comparison than 1986 is 1998, when President Bill Clinton enjoyed a great midterm
A politician who evokes violent resistance in such broad terms as did Joni Ernst -- and who refuses to clarify let alone walk them back -- is certainly not appealing to the better angels of our nature. By ginning up the darkest fears of extremists, she is playing a dangerous game.