20somethings

You are not a bad person. You don't have to fix everything at once. Asking this question means you've already taken a huge
When I see Marnie on Girls I feel as though my personality was written down and slapped on a female body then put to television. Marnie Michaels is an on-screen reminder of how far I have come, how far I have to go, and how I want to conduct myself and not conduct myself.
To commemorate my 26 years of life (and to preface my 27th), and to help my fellow 20-somethings by sharing the wealth of my fountain of knowledge (read that with a tinge of sarcasm), here are the 26 most important things I've learned thus far in my 20s.
You notice the sweet smell of dragon fruit blossoms as you take a stroll down the street to fill up your water bottles (you'll get sick if you drink the tap water). You aren't sure what the latest fall fashions are, and you don't really care.
As an underclassman trying to get to know the ropes of a new school, it was difficult to foresee the flutter that would eventually erupt come first semester- sophomore year.
You were too scared to commit to the avocado and now you've left it too late. All it wanted was to be yours. But you missed your window. Avos don't wait for long. They never do. Especially the good ones.
Everyone's different. Different personalities. Different goals. As with everything else, having a healthy financial life can look different for everyone. To find the budget style that's best for you, start by writing down all the elements of your finances:
It doesn't matter how old you are -- everyone wants beautiful skin. But it's not just a matter of slathering on myriad creams, gels, and elixirs to treat skin issues -- your lifestyle has a lot to do with how your complexion looks and feels.
As much as Sex and The City wanted us to think it, New York isn't your boyfriend. And since it isn't your dumb boyfriend, it's free to be perfect -- and New York is perfect. I recently had two West Coasters say things like, "New York is great, but all people do there is sit in bars and talk." Can you imagine anything better?
Chronic pain has forced me to see the world in a different way. It has forced me to embrace all of my vulnerabilities and genuinely be a better person. Ironically, because of my chronic pain, I am now finally able to do exactly what I always dreamed of.
I have a confession to make: I spent my 20s as one of the most insecure, unsure, conflicted people you could ever hope to meet. Looking back, I realize that the vast majority of the way my 20s played out was my own doing.
When you are 22, good advice is hard to come by. Why? Because in your 20s, everyone wants you to make decisions that serve their needs.
People like to idealize perfectionism. They convey it as an endearing quirk, a Woody Allen-esque neurosis. But here's the thing: Striving for excellence and setting unrealistic expectations for yourself are very different things.
We were untamed, raw and daring. We used words like f*ck and sh*t proudly and loudly at stupid boys and into thin air. We didn't worry about what others thought about us, because we were happy with who we are.
I never knew how much I was truly cared about or that I actually influence people's lives. Society has a tendency to see me as a broken individual, but with love, I've learned to shatter those lenses and begin to see myself as a source of love.
I no longer want a $500 leather jacket that will probably get beer spilled all over it at a party. My ideal Christmas list simply consists of one intangible item that certainly cannot fit in Santa's bag: future employment.
From one disheveled, stressed out twenty-something to another, you are not alone. Step back and enjoy this time of your life -- it may seem overwhelming, but these years fly by. Don't take any of these experiences for granted.
It may suck to constantly be broke, not have any clue what we're doing with our lives and eat ramen noodles for dinner every night, but we'll never be as free as we are right now.